Thursday, October 24, 2013

The Bunny Hop – Poetry Hop That Is!


               Poetry Friday this week is hosted by the lovely and talented writer, Irene Latham, who blogs at Live Your Poem!  Be sure to congratulate Irene on her 1000th post!   Go over for a long visit!


 Started by April Halprin Wayland of the Teaching Authors blog a few weeks ago, I am officially joining the Children’s Poetry Blog Hop, letting Mortimer hop around while I write.  
       I’m supposed to answer one question from the person who tagged me, then add two of my own, and answer them as well.  Finally, tag one or two others that will continue on… 

Jone McCullough tagged me, writing from her blog, Check it Out on October 10th.  Thanks Jone!

The question I chose to answer from Jone's HOP is "Do you like funny poems or beautiful ones?"
   
       I think I've loved beautiful ones, like Mary Oliver's or William Stafford's, more often, but lately have been examining the challenges of writing funny ones and enjoying them more and more.  It seems to me that poets who "write funny" have an extraordinary talent and sense of humor.  I am trying to look at everything in different ways lately and hope it will help me improve my attempts at funny poetry.  


My questions:

What is one funny poem you can recite that you use for children?  

    It’s a tongue-twister, because I like to show kids that poetry is such fun to say aloud.  Everyone probably knows it, but here it is.  Hope it’s new to some!

Moses supposes his toeses are roses,
But Moses supposes erroneously;
For nobody's toeses are posies of roses,
                                                   As Moses supposes his toeses to be.          

What is a favorite poem to use that grabs kids who are middle-school-aged and older?

         A recent find is James W. Hall’s “Maybe Dats Your Pwoblem, Too”, has Spiderman talking about his problems, and kids easily see that his problems connect with theirs, finding out ‘who’ they are, and what kind of people they wish to be.  
         Here's the beginning:
                      "All my pwoblems
                      who knows, maybe evwybody's pwoblems
                      is due to da fact, due to da awful twuth
                      dat I am SPIDERMAN."



          It’s great, and the poem is shared by Hall here!

          That’s it, that’s my part of hopping, and I’m going to pass the carrot on to Bridget Magee
who writes every.single.day at Wee Words for Wee ones.  Amazing!!  She'll be posting with Mortimer next week on Nov. 1st, the day after Halloween.  Maybe she'll have some leftover candy for us?  Bridget is a writer, poet, speaker, and Mom.  When not writing picture books, poetry, speeches, and notes to put in her girls' lunches, you can find her reading, running, and trying to calm down her crazy dog, Smidgey.  She lives in Tucson, AZ with her husband, Joe, and two daughters, Colleen and Maureen, and of course, Smidgey. 


         Please do hop over to visit Bridget to see what bunnies she has in her back yard!


32 comments:

  1. Oh, what fun to see the tidbits Mortimer drew out over here! I always learn something at your blog - resources for younger students or older ones or (sometimes especially) "seasoned" folks like me. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Thanks Robyn, I''m hopping over to see what Mortimer brought to you, too!

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  2. The Moses poem (new to me!) reminded me of tripping over Dr. Seuss's "Fox in Socks" with my children when they were little. One of my favorites to share with older ES kids and middle schoolers is Tony Mitten's "Brave Boy Rap" -- a cheeky retelling of the Theseus myth.

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  3. The Moses poem is fun, and you're right to connect with Seuss. Thanks also for "Brave Boy Rap", Laura. I'll be sure to look it up!

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  4. Great Mortimer Minute, Linda! The Moses poem is a perfect fit for my son. I just shared it with him and now he's walking from room to room reciting it. :) I also can see how powerful that Spiderman poem would be for older kids-- another keeper.

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    1. It's terrific to hear that about dear Moses, Michelle. It's been bouncing around my head for a long time-just right for being silly! Happy you enjoyed it all!

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  5. Thank you for getting me thinking about Moses toeses on this Friday morning, Linda! Such fun! And thanks for the shout out and the Mortimer Hop...looking forward to seeing where he hops after me.

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    1. You're welcome, Bridget. Thanks for 'hoppin'" with me!

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  6. Now I have Moses toeses stuck in my head! :)

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    1. Ha! That's why it's such fun to memorize, I think!

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  7. I do love the more "serious" poets you mentioned but also enjoy humorous verse. Since humor is very subjective, I think it's harder to write in some ways, especially for kids. Can't get Moses out of my head either. See what you started :)?

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    1. Perhaps that's it-different perspectives. Thanks Jama-sorry about moses supposes...

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  8. Knew the Moses poem - always cute. And the Spiderman poem was terrific!

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    1. Thanks Donna. Spidey always intrigues; my students loved it too!

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    2. How did you happen upon the Spiderman poem? I went to Hall's website, but found no link from there to easily get to it. And it doesn't look like he has others.

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    3. I sent you an e-mail. I find the link above working.

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  9. Hi, Linda! I wasn't familiar with the Moses poem, but it's soooo catchy and fun! Thanks for sharing it today. I'm a big fan of the "funny poem," too. But those special beautiful poems always give me goosebumps. Mortimer stopped by my blog today, too. He's one busy bunny!

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    1. Glad you like Moses, and there are so many poems to like, I agree. I'll come see what Mortimer's up to today! Thanks Liana!

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  10. Fun poems, Linda! I especially liked Moses'!

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    1. I wonder if your little boy will like Moses, too, Matt? Thanks!

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  11. Dat's my pwobwem! My suit is fwame resistant. And I never knew!

    That was hilarious Linda! I'll never envy Spiderman again.

    Violet N.

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    1. Thanks Violet. This poem has been a lifeline for poetry in my classroom of the past. The students loved it, and know immediately that poetry can mean much to them. So glad you enjoyed it!

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  12. Loved your Mortimer Minute and your funny poems!

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    1. Thanks Ruth. There are always fun poems to love!

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  13. You're right about the Spiderman poem; I think older kids will really relate to his feelings. I first heard the Moses poem in "Singin' in the Rain," when Donald O'Connor and Gene Kelly sang it during an elocution lesson. It's a great scene. Thanks for reminding me of it today. Now I'll be singing it all day!

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    1. And thanks for reminding me too, Catherine. I've forgotten about that scene. Maybe that's when my family taught it to me? Seems as if I've always known it!

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  14. Hi there dearest Linda. My heart leapt to my throat after I've read your first poem. Suffice it to say that it simply made me wistful. strange how a tongue twister can do that. :) Thank you for always bringing light, comfort and beautiful poetry every week.

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    1. Maybe wistful for that babyhood of a while ago? Thanks for coming by, Myra!

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  15. Funny, Linda, but I always associate the Moses poem with SINGING IN THE RAIN, where I first heard it in the scene with the elocution coach.
    How fun to have you join in the hop!

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    1. I know, someone else said this too, & perhaps that's where it started in my family, & when I memorized it? Thanks Carmela!

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  16. Linda! Fab Mortimer Minute! I wish I could take credit for creating this event, but wonder woman Janet Wong (www.janetwong.com) is the brains behind this idea!
    Your question makes me think about both William Stafford and that wonderful poet, Anonymous...especially this one:
    ONE BRIGHT DAY

    One bright day in the middle of the night,
    Two dead boys got up to fight.
    Back to back they faced each other,
    Drew their swords and shot each other.
    Deaf policemen heard the noise,
    Came and shot the two dead boys.
    If you do not believe this lie is true,
    Go ask the blind man--he saw it, too.

    ~Anonymous

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    1. I wondered about the original April, but finding people who said it was you. Sorry, & will give Janet credit this Friday! Thanks for the poem, I know it but haven't seen it for a long while!

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Having a conversation is a good thing!