Thursday, January 16, 2014

"A Little Consideration"

                Poetry Friday, a lovely time to end the week with poetry celebration. This week with Keri, at Keri Recommends, where she's also celebrating her birthday!  Go on over to help her celebrate! (She has cookies!)

       Every day to and from work, I walk past this bird feeder, created by a class at my school, and enjoy the color, the joyous look of it, especially in winter.  I decided to write about its purpose, as I see it.  Here is my celebration of it.


 "A little Consideration, a little Thought for Others, makes all the    

                                                   difference."
                                                                -- Pooh's LittleInstruction Book, inspired by A. A. Milne








Winter Views

Most birds have flown;
it’s winter after all.

It braids its tones of muted color
into the lonely sounds of geese
that fly the sky.
From creek to lake to pond,
they cry.

Sad are the robins creeping;
there’s nothing to be found.
They toddle, pecking at the dirt,
ignorant of worms working
only underground.

Crows speak in thinnest caws,
grumbling as they sit
waiting in bare trees,
little here for brightest birds, little here
to please.

The color found in made-up birds
conversing in the bath
will serve as welcome wagon
when real ones arrive

at last.
        Linda Baie © All Rights Reserved

33 comments:

  1. "It braids its tones of muted color/ into the lonely sounds of geese..." - wow, that's lovely, Linda.

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    1. Thank you Julie. This was fun to write and consider the color too.

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  2. Makes me feel like I should put some seed out!
    Very evocative, Linda: "Crows speak in thinnest caws,
    grumbling as they sit"

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    1. I know there must be a bluejay somewhere, but I don't see them here in my new home, just those crows and robins! Thanks, Tabatha.

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  3. This was beautiful, Linda. Lots of parts to please! Those little colorful birds at the feeder are good reminders of the colors to come!

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    1. Thanks Donna, now we play the waiting game for spring!

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  4. Very nice! I like these lines: little here for brightest birds, little here
    to please.

    It sounds as if little birds are speaking!

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    1. Thanks Diane, it was an exercise in a tribute to that birdbath, which really does brighten my every day.

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  5. The robin stanza is so melancholy, but beautiful, Linda. Lovely winter poem.

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    1. Thanks Laura. I do see sadness in them as they walk around, & I wonder what they find!

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  6. I miss the bird activity in our woods every winter. Luckily, the robins usually arrive back from their winter vacations pretty early, usually February. It's too quiet with the crows cawing and woodpeckers pecking. Like the subdued tone in your poem and the bit of cheer at the end. That *is* a very cool bird feeder!

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    1. should be "without" the crows cawing. . .

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    2. Thanks Jama-being near the woods I thought you might see more than I do, but winter has its own inhabitants-the rabbits and squirrels are still around!

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  7. You've captured the wistfulness feeling one has in the middle of winter for all things spring, most especially color. Lovely poem, Linda! I love the idea of a "welcome wagon" for all creatures come spring. =)

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    1. Thanks Bridget, I think our latest warm weather (comes & goes) has me already looking far ahead!

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  8. Echoing Bridget, I think your interpretation of sculpted colorful birds as the spring welcoming committee for the real ones yet to arrive is wonderful. Thanks for sharing this winter poem, Linda!

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    1. Thanks Robyn-I imagine them 'calling' when all the rest of us are out of sight!

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  9. Love much about this, Linda, especially:
    >>Crows speak in thinnest caws,<<

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    1. Thanks Carmela, I appreciate your words.

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  10. Lovely poem for a lonely birdbath waiting for spring to come.

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    1. Thanks Margaret-hoping it will be busy soon!

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  11. Oh, I love this poem, Linda - each stanza capturing something melancholy and awaiting in spirit. And what a joyous bird bath - it would make me smile to pass by this every day!

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    1. Thanks Tara-the winter is an interesting time, isn't it? I love some parts, and others not so much. Part may be that I so adore primary colors, and winter provides few.

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  12. Your poem is beautiful!

    And did you know that tomorrow (January 18th) is A. A. Milne's birthday (or would be if he were still alive)?

    Violet N.

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    1. No, I didn't know, Violet. I spent many happy hours reading Pooh stories and poems to my children. Thank you!

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  13. Our Environmental Club is going to be dipping into the world of ornithology for the next couple of weeks as we gear up for the Great Backyard Bird Count. Let those few who remain know that THEY COUNT!!

    (As an aside, I saw a funny somewhere...probably FB...of two crows sitting on a fence, titled, "Attempted Murder." HA!)

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    1. I think now I've written about crows 3 times, & surely there are more birds in your state than here, Mary Lee. By the time the Backyard Bird Count happens, more will show, plus you have those beautiful cardinals, which I miss seeing. They don't come to Colorado!

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  14. Ooh, I really like the sounds in this poem, Linda, and the distinct images you've created, like "It braids its tones of muted color / into the lonely sounds of geese...". Just lovely! I think the birds will be happy to splash in that colorful bath come spring - but for now I'm glad it's brightening your daily walk!

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    1. Thank you, Renee. Hope the year is starting beautifully for you!

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  15. Beautiful! And what a wonderful bird feeder!

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    1. Thanks Ruth-they created it well, didn't they?

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  16. Such a welcome mat! Your poem and the feeder are both great reminders that Spring is more than just a time of year, it is a state of mind.

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    1. Thanks Michelle, and winter does have its images, doesn't it?

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Having a conversation is a good thing!