Sunday, February 16, 2014

Monday Reading - Lots Going On

Happy Reading everyone!


 It's Monday! What are you Reading? is hosted by Jen at TEACH.MENTOR.TEXTS, and shared with Ricki and Kellee at UNLEASHING READERS.   
         And, also visit Sheila at BOOK JOURNEYS for more reviews.  Great books are being shared!
 Tweet! at #IMWAYR
        Hurrah! Cybil's winners were announced on Friday, Valentine's Day! The winners can be found here! Congratulations to everyone!

#NFPB10for10 - Remember that Wednesday, Cathy Mere and Mandy Robek are hosting this event!  Don't miss it!
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I read a book that met two challenges on the sidebar this week.  Week by week this year, I hope I can find time to read all that are on the list in a page posted above.  Go to Carrie Gelson's post here to discover what it's all about and who's participating (tweet at #MustReadin2014), or go to Gathering Books with Myra, Fats & Iphigene to see their challenge!    


The Nazi Hunters: How A Team Of Spies and Survivors Captured The World's Most Notorious Nazi, by Neal Bascomb

             This story chronicles the years spent by those persistent enough to find the most notorious and heinous Nazis responsible for sending millions of Jews to their deaths. It includes personal stories woven throughout, the past that continued to haunt even after Hitler’s Germany was defeated, after Israel became a free state. For example, in the village of Dobradovo, Hungary, a man named Zeev Sapir opened his door to the Hungarian police who were cooperating with the German army. He and his family, parents and five siblings, were ordered to pack, to carry no more than fifty kilos per person. The remainder of their belongings including priceless heirlooms were confiscated. Those in this small town joined a nearby larger town where 14,000 were crammed into an old brick factory. Some died along the way, others died at the factory, forced to eat only weak potato soup, with little water fro the entire community. Somehow Zeez’s family lived through rains which brought more illnesses like typhoid fever, until an “inspection” by the important Adolph Eichmann. In driving rain, they were told they were to be sent elsewhere to protect them from advancing armies. Zeev, at 20, remembered that day, the promises made.
      Well, you know that Eichmann was lying; all were sent to Auschwitz. This is just one story included in this search for the man who managed the final solution to the Jewish question. It begins with a random sighting by a random person in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Years pass, but finally, the man is identified and plans are made, meticulously carried out.  It’s a fascinating, serious and spine-tingling telling of heartbreaking stories and utter dedication to bringing Eichmann to trial, the only Nazi brought to trial by Israelis, in Israel. Zeev Sapir did survive although some of his family did not, and he plays an important part of the end of this amazing tale. There are numerous photos along with the bibliography and footnotes from the research Bascomb accomplished for this book.


Harlem’s Little Blackbird – reviewed here for non-fiction picture book Wednesday!          #NFPB2014

Here's a book just out, perfect for the younger ones!

Peter Panda Melts Down - written by Artie Bennett, illustrated by John Nez

               Obviously, Artie Bennett has a great sense of humor, even for the pre-school kids!  I loved his earlier book, “Poopendous!”, as did all the kids at my school! I can’t wait to share this with my young granddaughters, and then the primary students. Teachers will love it too! This story shows dear Peter Panda having a few melt-downs, and then working his way through the day with a little help from his mama, and unfortunately “more” meltdowns. Since I have some grandchildren, I know exactly what “melt-downs” are all about, and they usually happen with their mama, too.  Written in rhyme, this has some action for everyone, at the grocery and library, at dinner and bath-time! “Don’t carry on, Peter. It’s such a nice day./If you simmer down, we’ll go somewhere to play.” I love the sweet pictures, yes, “sweet”, by John Nez, of all the young animals throughout, especially at the park, and then of dear Peter. Young kids have such exciting things happening in their lives, and to stop them takes real self-control. Even mamas need a bit  of it now and then.  It’s a very fun read!
             Book supplied by the author!
more lovely picture books

As The City Sleeps - written and illustrated by Stephen T. Johnson
               Stephen Johnson earned a Caldecott honor for Alphabet City, but I just discovered this book in a colleague’s classroom. Wow, if you want to inspire interesting, and perhaps creepy, stories in your writers, use the pages in this book. Most of the work is photographs, but altered. For example, on one page shows a view of a commuter train, and clearly the people are from a different age, men and women with hats of early twentieth century. Like each page, the text is spare. One says: “Ghost Riders, last seen in 1936, they vanished without a trace.” It’s a book for the imagination!

The Invisible Boy – written by Trudy Ludwig and illustrated by Patrice Barton
              I’ve had several tell me to get this book, and finally I did!  Please don’t wait any longer if you haven’t read it yet. It’s a poignant story of too many in classrooms who are excluded and terribly lonely. It will be a terrific read aloud to discuss more than once with a class. A young boy named Brian is left out in most of the school activities, going unnoticed by even his teacher, until his smile and a thoughtful note begins a friendship with a boy new to the class. Patrice Barton’s beautiful illustrations help tell the story in a magical way. You’ll need to find the book to discover what I mean by magical! The book’s back matter also shares guiding questions and books for both adults and children that will help continue the discussion about inclusion and exclusion. 
                                                                                                                               
What’s Your Favorite Animal – written by Eric Carle and Friends
             There is a pleasure in looking at illustrations, why I adore picture books so much. The story in words is fascinating, and added to so beautifully by illustrators. I hope someday to visit the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art.  Just to visit the museum’s web page is a delight!  In this book, Eric has invited “friends” (illustrators) to share their favorite animals, in words and of course in pictures too. It is a wonderful book to read and see, filled with double-spread pages for study of a favorite, or for imagining one’s own favorite animal. Don’t forget to take a look, a long look! If I could choose a favorite page, it would be that of Stephen Kellogg, and the story behind his favorite animal, the cow!

Catching Kisses - written by Amy Gibson and illustrated by Maria Van Lieshout
          This will be fun to share with a young child, all about kisses, coming your way, traveling through traffic, soft as a whisper or loud with a “smack”. Kisses are flying, and they tickle too. The story has traveling illustrations showing children watching to see where the kisses are go, and a map in the back to see if you recognized the places included.  The illustrations are graphic, and include lots of silhouettes.

Next: I'm on vacation this week, so have a great stack of books from the library and almost finished with Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein-wonderful! Maybe Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell next!


28 comments:

  1. I'm glad you finally got to read The Invisible Boy. It's definitely a book that every school or library should have because it's one of those books that might be exactly what a certain kind of kid needs to feel not alone. Enjoy your vacation week! -Earl

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    1. I agree, Earl, it was just wonderful! I've already donated it to my library hoping it reaches the kids who need it! Thanks!

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  2. I just adored The Invisible Boy. So glad that you liked it and how lovely that you have donated it to your library. I can't wait to get my hands on What's Your Favourite Animal. there is a book store visit in my future to find this book! Your description of As the City Sleeps has me completely curious! Looks very interesting.

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    1. And I'm so glad I found The Invisible Boy from you and then others, Carrie. It is special! As The City Sleeps is a little creepy, wonderful, but maybe not for younger kids. It'll be interesting to see what you think! Thank you!

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  3. The Nazi Hunters sounds fascinating, Linda, a book I want to read as much as I want to share with my kids. I saw The Monuments Men with Bonnie last night - so many stories about that war which are little known! You have convinced me to purchase The Invisible Boy - here goes!

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    1. Yes, you're right, your students will like The Nazi Hunters. The persistence and dedication alone was amazing. And The Invisible Boy, beautifully crafted! Thanks Tara!

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  4. Linda, Thanks for sharing today. I keep forgetting to add the Nazi Hunters to my to read list on Good Reads. Just took care of it thanks to your reminder. Will also have to check out the Invisible Boy.

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    1. Hope you do find both of these books Tony. They're well worth it!

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  5. I loved reading The Nazi Hunters. It taught me so much. When Eichmann was referenced in one of my recent books, I felt a lot more knowledgable about him. Thanks for sharing your review about the book!

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    1. Yes, well worth the read. I was amazed at the detail they covered in order to accomplish the mission! Thanks, Ricki!

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  6. So many wonderful books. Carle's new one is a favorite. Haven't shared it with my students, yet. Must do that soon.

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    1. Isn't it such fun. I think it would make a beautiful project for research and art! Thanks, Katherine!

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  7. Peter Panda Melts Down sounds like one for our bookshelf. Thanks for the recommendation.

    Isabelle has been enjoying Catching Kisses for the past two weeks. We read it almost every night at bedtime.

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    1. Thanks, Stacey, so happy to hear she likes Catching Kisses. It is so cute!

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  8. The Nazi Hunters sounds like a very interesting book. Thanks for all the links in this post. I really liked participating in the 10 for 10 blog tour so will consider the non-fiction version this week. Have a great reading week!

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    1. I'll look for you, Wednesday, Andrea! It'll be fun! And The Nazi Hunters would be great for your students! Thank you!

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  9. I thought The Invisible Boy was a wonderful read. I made sure to let my guidance counselor know about it so she could use it in her groups.

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    1. What a terrific idea, Maria. We have a psychologist a few days a week, so I should let her know about the book, too. It really is a lovely book.

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  10. LOVED The Nazi Hunters. Reading it was like watching a spy movie.

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  11. I just ordered Invisible Boy today. Oh, thank you so much for announcing the NF 10for10. I can't believe I almost missed it. Phew!

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    1. So glad you found the notice! And hope you love The Invisible Boy-worth owning!

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  12. I always look forward to your recommendations, Linda. Nazi Hunters sounds like a book to keep me up at night. I think that I will buy a copy of the Invisible Boy to donate to one of my girls' classrooms---such a beautiful, important book. Enjoy vacation

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    1. Thanks Melanie-if you read Nazi Hunters, hope you like the dedication of the Israelis to accomplish this mission. It was really amazing. And The Invisible Boy is lovely-what a nice thing to buy a copy for the class.

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  13. I recently ordered Invisible Boy after reading about it on Carrie's blog. Looking forward to sharing and discussing with my Children's Lit class. Nazi Hunters is one I've been wanting to read. I think it's on the list for The Hub's Reading Challenge, so I will probably try to read it for that one. I'm hoping to put together a post for Wed, but wow, it's HARD to narrow down my must-have nonfiction PBs to just 10!! Enjoy your vacation reading! I'm going on vacation in March (first one in 2 years--woo!) and already making piles of potential books to bring plus purchasing for Kindle!

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    1. Te he, we do make such lofty reading goals for vacation, don't we? I've already had a change in plans that will take some time away from my reading-but will try to do as much as I can. Hope you enjoy those two books, Elisabeth! Thanks!

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  14. Hi Linda! Glad to hear that you're on vacation - how awesome! Perfect time for reading. I have just included Invisible Boy in my text-set for my class as we discuss "the others" in the classroom. I am so happy to note that it's available in our public library. Will probably feature this as well for our upcoming theme. It would be so exciting to visit the Eric Carle Museum of Art - I'm sure the place is surreal with such beautiful artworks. I'd probably save The Nazi Hunters when we finally push through with our War and Poetry theme late this year. The Book Thief has squeezed me dry in terms of emotions - will probably need a breather from Nazi Germany :)

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    1. So glad you can find The Invisible Boy-terrific! Yes, the Carle museum would be wonderful to see I'm sure! And I just also finished Rose Under Fire, another book about that terrible war. After The Book Thief I'm sure you do need a break. Happy Reading to you, Myra!

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Having a conversation is a good thing!