Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Beetles - Crashing the Party!

I participate in the Nonfiction Picture Book Challenge hosted by Alyson Beecher at Kidlit Frenzy. For learning about the terrific nonfiction books available, be sure to visit all the blogs that link up!

Scientists In The Field: Beetle Busters, A Rogue Insect and the People Who Track It - written by Loree Griffin Burns and photographs by Ellen Harasimowicz
            Ever since the book about the vanishing little brown bat I've been hooked on these books. They're so filled with useful information, so interesting to read and try to apply the learning to other problems specific to our own area, also to figure out what problems may be as close as the neighborhood. If you lived in Worcester, Massachusetts, you would understand, because the work there to help track and destroy this beetle is there. The beetle was moved from Asia because of a mistake in planting trees, a plan to use the trees which were not wisely chosen, and the export of wood in the guise of shipping pallets. The information about the beetle, how trees grow, and the "hopeful" solving of the problem is excellent. 


            I am excited to read this because the Colorado mountains have been going through their own 'beetle' problems, the pine beetle, that has destroyed areas of beautiful pines in the mountains. Thee still is no known antidote for this infestation. In the book, the only way to control (which they believe has been done) this beetle is to find the trees that have been infested, & destroy them. You can read more about the pine beetle here.

14 comments:

  1. This book was on the CYBILS list and was one of my favorites! Really interesting! And sad when you drive through the mountains of Colorado. It's amazing how much devastation these little guys have wrought!

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    1. I know- it's terrible to see! Amazing work detailed in this book!

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  2. I am very keen to read this title too Linda. Beetles devastated the pine trees near my childhood home - was shocking to see.

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    1. I learned so much from this book. Wish there was a student studying beetles this year. Maybe someone is studying insects?

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  3. We have our own little bug eating trees as well. I'm glad scientists are learning more about them - it's such a practical world problem that kids can see and then read about what is being done about them! Nice when science and the real world work together :)

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    1. Well, sad to hear that several of you have had your own personal (geographical) issues with beetles. I'll look at them in a whole different way after this.

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  4. Hi Linda,
    I think these are the beetles that they found in the trees near my home. Thank you for sharing this title. I love these scientists in the field books. They give kids a perspective of the people behind the research.

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    1. Absolutely, and I should have shared that there was a student group involved in the Massachusetts area. Is that your area? The books are wonderfully comprehensive.

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  5. Linda - Did you see the video that I shared in my Mock-Sibert post along with this book? Wow! How destructive to the trees.

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    1. I don't remember seeing it, will look for it. Thanks Alyson-scary little things!

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  6. Thank you for featuring this title Linda. I definitely want to read it. We are losing all our ash trees due to beetles. I've had to spend several thousand dollars to have mine removed.

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    1. Oh no, so sorry, for the trees & the money. When you read the book, you realize what a challenge it is to do something about them.

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  7. Oohlala, looks like a mighty fun and scary read - great combination! :)

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    1. Thanks, Myra. It really is scary to see so much devastation.

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