Thursday, April 9, 2015

Poetry Friday - Always Special

              It's Poetry Friday, this week north at Writing The World for Kids, with Laura Purdie Salas, who's been offering wonderful tips and tricks for sharing and writing poetry with children this April. Thanks, Laura.

created by Leigh Anne Eck
at A Day In The Life 
        It's Poetry Month, and a daily pleasure to read so many wonderful poems and challenges throughout the poetry blogger world. Its hard to be so busy at school during April!
        I'm working hard to write haiku and haiku-related poetry every day this month. Tricia Stohr-Hunt at Miss Rumphius has been of great help with her forms posts. Here is the first one about haiku. and there are others after that. Every week I'm grateful for what Diane Mayr at Random Noodling and Robyn Hood Black at Life On The Deckle Edge write and share in their haiku worlds. It's been a challenge to see what I can do with fewer words!
           Some of us are sharing on twitter with the hashtag #DigiPoetry, created by Margaret Simon, of Reflections on The Teche.You're welcome to join us. Find the many Poetry Month offerings rounded up by Jama Rattigan at Jama's Alphabet Soup.  

9)
tree-shaded poem
bleeding hearts, in line -
after daffodils

Linda Baie © All Rights Reserved

34 comments:

  1. Linda,
    Haiku does force us to do more with fewer words. You managed beautifully: "tree shaped poem." I decided to write a haiku last night. It really is an exercise in finding the perfect words.
    Cathy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Cathy, it's been a good challenge for me.

      Delete
  2. Linda, you got me with those "bleeding hearts, in line" ! Love! I am loving your haiku. Thank you! xo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome, Irene. I am loving your Artspeak, too.

      Delete
  3. Linda, your haiku captured springtime joy reminding me that there is a fresh spirit in this season. The bug has kept me from picking up the pace this week so Winter Whisperings is still under cover.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. From seeing your recent weather, I understand that it would be 'under cover'. Take good care, Carol, & thank you!

      Delete
  4. Lovely, Linda! I'm so looking forward to those bleeding hearts in my own shady garden. But first, daffodils!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I assume they're coming soon, JoAnn. Thanks.

      Delete
  5. Yep. The bleeding hearts are beautiful. Nice, Linda.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Beautiful photo and impressive range of feeling in so few words. Well done!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. Flowers in spring are inspiring!

      Delete
  7. Lovely, Linda! Good to hear you are enjoying writing haiku this month and soaking up the inspiration from other bloggers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Jama, I am for sure. It makes me slow down & look!

      Delete
  8. I hear ya, Linda! It seems like however much time we have available in April, it's never enough.

    Bleeding hearts is such a wonderful subject for a haiku. The name alone says volumes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This was a hard one because I wanted to say more about these gorgeous flowers. Thanks, Michelle.

      Delete
    2. So, try a tanka and you'll have two more lines to do it in. And, with a tanka you can use poetic devices!

      Delete
  9. Those beautiful "bleeding hearts." What is that flower?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That flower is a 'bleeding heart" Margaret. You can find more pictures on Google Images.

      Delete
  10. I'm obviously not the first to say it, but the 'bleeding hearts' are perfect! Nicely done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Matt. The flower is so inspiring, looks & name!

      Delete
  11. We had a bleeding heart in with our daffodils at our last house, and they do wait in line for the daffodils to be finished with their display. I should get some more - I liked them, but forgot about them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They simply seem to appear overnight, & I've noticed it these years. I was happy to have somewhere to write about them this time. Thanks, Donna.

      Delete
  12. I love the play on bleeding hearts and " in line after" for a minute I went to activists on a street corner or in a forest... The plant has such interesting leaf and flower shapes. We see them at nurseries in Florida. You are inspiring with this challenge!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Lee Ann. Exciting that you thought of other ideas with my poem.

      Delete
  13. Gorgeous! (words and picture :-)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Sometimes I look at beautiful things in nature, and it seems almost sacrilege to write a poem about them. They already are poems. But then I read more nature poems like yours that add TO the natural thing, share it and make it more. Yay!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Laura. There is additional thought, but I know what you mean. As I look at nature more closely, I wonder if I can add anything to the beauty, & then I attempt that next step. Sometimes it seems to work, not always.

      Delete
  15. Lovely haiku, Linda! Bleeding hearts are my favorite flowers...after daffodils. =)

    ReplyDelete
  16. Lovely images, Linda. Thanks so much for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome, Catherine. Happy you enjoyed them.

      Delete
  17. I started to comment and then it disappeared, so, I'll try again. Keep up the good work with your haiku! And thanks for the shout-out. You're on to bleeding hearts? Not only have we not had the daffodils, we've barely begun with the crocuses!

    ReplyDelete

Having a conversation is a good thing!