Thursday, July 23, 2015

Watching Little Things

           Poetry Friday is at Margaret Simon's Reflection on The Teche this week.  Come to visit those who share!

         It's not a new thought, yet this poem from some days ago on The Writer's Almanac showed a little bit more what people mean when they say to notice the little things. Joyce Sutphen shows that beautifully.  

Things To Watch While You Drive
                                   by Joyce Sutphen

The trees, slipping
across the fields, changing places with
barns and silos,
the hills, rolling over
on command,

          The remaining lines are here.

Taken one evening, from my car.
           Thanks to Tabatha at The Opposite of Indifference for sharing my poem, Margaret Simon's and Diane Mayr's too, written and sent for the summer swap. It is a special pleasure writing for someone. And as I shared poems I've received in the past two Poetry Fridays, it's also wonderful to receive poems for me. Tabatha's swap idea of giving poetry has spread a lot of joy these past years. 

22 comments:

  1. I love Joyce Sutphen's poem so much, Linda! Such startling, vivid imagery. <3

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    1. I do too, Tabatha. It's another one of those poems you want to keep close and read often. Thanks!

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  2. This is a day I need to focus on the little things. So much grief and anger to get through. Thanks for your kind words.

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    1. You're so welcome, Margaret. I wake to the news each day, & find this sadness. Thanks for hosting even in this hard time.

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  3. Yes, noticing the little things is the work of poets. I love this: "a flock of birds/
    carrying the sky by the corners/a giant sheet of blue" Sigh.

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    1. It is wonderful, isn't it, Catherine. Thank you!

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  4. I also love the flock of birds carrying the sky by the corners...Thanks for sharing, Linda.

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    1. You're welcome, Monica. It is filled with lovely images!

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  5. Linda, love this poem, especially since I've recently spent a lot of time watching the road while driving lots of miles. I missed the poem (was in KS trying to stay unplugged), so thanks for sharing it here!

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    1. I know you've driven so many miles since I last saw you. Hope you're home and relaxing now I'm glad I shared since you missed it. It is going to be a favorite. Thanks, Ramona!

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  6. I loved (and saved) that one when it came to my inbox. Those hills rolling over...and the last stanza:

    "the road, always
    twisting towards or away from you —
    both, at the same time."

    Perfect.

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    1. It's always wonderful when a poem "arrives" like this one, isn't it? Glad you noticed it too, Mary Lee.

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  7. I love those chubby hill bellies!

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    1. Agreed, much to love (and see) here. Thanks, Diane.

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  8. I love the poem (especially the double view of the road -- toward and away) and love your photo, too, Linda. Thank you.

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    1. You're welcome, Karen. I do notice quite a bit when I drive, but now this poem pushes me to look for word images too.

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  9. I love the last stanza- that road going away and coming toard. Also the sun-tigers… Wow!

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    1. It is nice, isn't it, that thought of movement. Thanks, Carol.

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  10. Yes, the little things can save our lives, can't they? Any time I am feeling angry or sad or whatever, if I turn to the little things -- or the big things, like the sky in your pic -- I always cheer up in the face of beauty and all there is to be grateful for. Thank you for the lovely reminder. xo

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    1. Thanks, Irene, it is true for me, and why I love this poem that arrived, says a lot that's important to me!

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  11. This is beautiful, Linda. I picked up my thirteen year old grandson from the Atlanta airport last month and drove home to Columbus with him. It was so funny realizing that while he was watching the cars go by, identifying all the "cool" ones, I was watching the trees and the hills and the clouds. Enjoy the changing landscape as you head forward on your new journey, wherever it takes you.

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    1. Thank you for this story, Dori and for the wishes too, very fun to hear what the 13 year olds are watching for. I'll soon see my grandson, turning 14 next month, so will pay attention to that.

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Having a conversation is a good thing!