Thursday, December 10, 2015

Praising Play - Poetry Friday

         Tara Smith hosts us today at A Teaching Life. And she's helping us to end our week so wonderfully with a poem of Mary Oliver's. Thanks Tara!



             Among all the gloomy news and escalating conflicts, I've been reading too about the importance of play for children. There are also articles urging "play" for adults. All of us will benefit when we take time to explore, have fun, be outdoors in nature and laugh! 

           One article from The Washington Post is found here about children's play.  And another story is found here from NPR concerning adult play.



Ready, Set, Go!

It's a “Mother, may I”,
seesaw
day.
Cartwheeling, jumps,
swing and
sway,
four square, kickball
hopscotch

PLAY!
Linda Baie © All Rights Reserved

photo credit: Children dancing in circle bronze statue via photopin (license)

27 comments:

  1. Linda, play is a big concern of mine as I see too many kids who miss out on peer-instigated play. I have a Pinterest board on the topic if you're interested.

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    1. So good to hear this from you, Diane. I will look. Thanks!

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  2. Thank you so much for your much-needed topical post! I love reminiscing about all the childhood activities your lively poem brings to mind. "Play" is one of my favorite things to do, as well as one of my favorite words. I especially like to substitute "play" for "work"--as in "I'm playing with that" instead of "I'm working on that." Makes a task--or even a "work" assignment--seem less onerous and high-stakes serious. Thank you, too, for including the photo of the children at play. My heroes! God bless you!

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    1. I love that picture, found on PhotoPin! Thank you for the idea of "play" instead of "work". Adds a lot of 'fun', doesn't it?

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  3. Thanks for the great reminder to indulge the child within. Your poem brought back pleasant memories of playing hopscotch in grade school. Once I stayed after school to play with my friend and lost track of time -- my mom was so worried.

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    1. Although your mom was worried, it sounds like a good memory, Jama. My daughter has taught the grand-girls how to play hopscotch. They love it. We all need a little jumping around outside, don't we? Thanks!

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  4. Thanks for the joy here, Linda B! And I love the "mother may I"--something seldom heard these days.

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    1. I don't think any play it either, Jane. I'll ask Ingrid. She and her friends are very into making up stories and playing them out at recess. Thank you!

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  5. We live next door to a Montessori school, so I hear children playing a lot! Let's hear it for playfulness, at any age :-)

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    1. Yes, hurrah for Montessori schools, where Imi goes now, & of course my school where Ingrid goes get the kids out as often as they can. Glad to hear your news, Tabatha.

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  6. Yes. Play. Sometimes I think the best thing I give my gifted children is the gift of play. They are freed up to think and explore. Thank you for this.

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    1. Happy to hear what you do, Kimberley.

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  7. We were so free to play with no adult hovering over us, no grownup induced rules for games, and no fences to keep us close. And though there is seemingly more danger in the world, I strongly believe that we are killing our kids with our overprotectiveness. They are growing up to be bullies, be bullied, be wimps and overweight. There. I said it.
    Sigh. I don't think the dangers are quite as bad in general as we are led to believe. And I believe also that it is time for us to take back what we have lost.
    Wow. A rant.
    I LOVE your poem. So sing-song and happy. And thus it should be!

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    1. Thanks Donna. It's okay, I feel the same way. Check this article out from The Atlantic: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2014/04/hey-parents-leave-those-kids-alone/358631/

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  8. Lovely - and a perfect photo to go with it. Oh to keep the light-heartedness of childhood play always.

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  9. It's astonishing to me that we have studies about the importance of play for kids, but I'm happy to have permission to jump on the swings the next time I walk through the school playground! Love your playful poem!

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    1. When I taught, I ALWAYS claimed a swing for a bit! The kids loved that I would swing with them...actually made supervising playground easier, as I could see everyone and most took a bit of time to come over and talk to me while I was swinging!

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    2. Thanks, Catherine and Donna. I love to swing still, too. And Donna, you're right, it makes us be in the 'heart' of things, allowing the kids to pick their own favorite activity.

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  10. Yes, yes, play! Thank you, Linda, for the advice we all need to hear and heed - play every day. =)

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    1. You're welcome, Bridget, I do think your writing, so simple and apt, is a constant inspiration. Play is key!

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  11. Donna takes to the swings, and I to the four-square. I go back to fourth grade every time I play!

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    1. I like the four square too, Mary Lee. Lots of things to play on the playground!

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  12. The sculpture is wonderful, and your poem so evocative. I love the rhythm! Our library just sponsored an adult coloring night! Someone put on old show tunes and everyone sang along as they colored!

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    1. I love that sculpture too and tried to discover where it was, but the picture info didn't say. Your coloring night sounds wonderful. I think I've giving a few coloring books this year, maybe that big pack of 64 crayolas, too! Thanks Joyce.

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  13. Great rhythm for a poem about playing - love it!

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Having a conversation is a good thing!