Thursday, March 3, 2016

SOLC #4/31 Wanting To Learn Makes Learning Happen

SOLC #4/31 - 
      I'm slicing with the Two Writing Teachers community for Day Four of Thirty-One of the Slice of Life Challenge in March.  Thank you Stacey, Tara, Anna, Betsy, Dana, Kathleen, Beth, and Deb.  
       This is my second post today. I'm hosting Poetry Friday today here. I know that some of you do participate.

      You may know that I have two granddaughters, six and four. And they spend time with me, some of which is spent reading books.

      You may also know that I read many books from pre-school to YA, including picture books, fiction and non-fiction. And I review them.
       And some may know that I'm retired, a former teacher of middle-school-aged students in an independent school, and a former lit coach.
      SO, my teacher's dream is to work at a bookstore, and now I do. I volunteer one day a week at a local, volunteer-only managed, used bookstore. I am in heaven.

         There is a reason for this introduction. 


A few weeks ago I had a biography of Noah Webster from my library, the picture book bio titled W Is For Webster: Noah Webster and His American Dictionary by Tracey E. Fern, illustrated by Boris Kulikov. Ingrid asked about it (the cover is fascinating), so I told her a little and she wanted to read it. It's not really for young readers, but through answering questions and going slowly, Ingrid wanted to know more. She wanted a dictionary! Do I have one anymore? No. I sold many books in an estate sale and The American Heritage Dictionary was one. We looked for pictures on the Internet.
The front.

Thought those of you who are teachers
would enjoy this.
The first owner!

A few weeks passed, the book returned to the library. And last week, in the donations to the book store was a tattered dictionary, so I brought it home. (I really do try not to bring more books home every week!) And when Ingrid visited, we looked and looked. She is a beginning reader, and couldn't read many of the words, but we looked for ones she wanted to find. She now has the basic concept. Now it's time to find a dictionary just right for her, and I'll keep this one for the future.


If you primary teachers have a recommendation for a great beginning dictionary, please let me know.

34 comments:

  1. Smiled when I read "I really do try not to bring more books home every week!"... :0)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's very tempting when I browse, Loralee. There are so many interesting ones!

      Delete
  2. I hope that we get to hear more about the bookstore! That sounds perfect. Now, more importantly, a dictionary for Ingrid. In my classroom I've always enjoyed the children's dictionaries from Scholastic. They are accessible and the kids really enjoy lingering in them. Hopefully this helps to get you on a track to a dictionary for Ingrid! Best of luck.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Kendra. The Bookstore has been delightful. I'm sure I'll share more. Thanks for the tip for looking for a dictionary.

      Delete
  3. This post SO warms my heart. And I'm thrilled about your new bookstore volunteering - lucky patrons! I'm sure you'll get some good suggestions for Ingrid, but I'm also happy she can peruse/explore/get to know a "grown up" dictionary, too - there's magic in that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Robyn, she was fascinated.

      Delete
  4. How fun to be able to work in a bookstore! That's my 2nd dream job, too. If I wasn't a language arts teachers, I would've wanted to be a bookstore owner! :-) Fun post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it's a perfect 'retirement' job, Holly. Thanks.

      Delete
  5. Old books fascinate me. Thank you for the pictures. I wonder about the stories held in the worn pages. Scholastic has a beautiful visual picture dictionary that has the features of a regular dictionary with pictures to help children begin to be independent and find the fun in learning. Personally, I am a big Charlie Brown fan and I have an old CB dictionary with the Peanuts gang.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This bookstore is awash in old books, and wonderful new ones too. You would love browsing, Mary Helen! Thanks for the book recs!

      Delete
  6. This makes me so happy that your granddaughters will have and hold a dictionary that will match who they are in the reading writing process

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't it fun, & truly was a serendipitous event as you see because of that picture book. I'll be finding one for Ingrid soon. Thanks, Carrie.

      Delete
  7. Open the dictionary and fall in! I like this one (or older editions) for kids: http://store.scholastic.com/Books/Hardcover-Books/Scholastic-Childrens-Dictionary-2013-9780545604956

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Terrific, thanks very much Jane. I will find it!

      Delete
  8. I love how Ingrid has that internal love of learning. Her grandmother is a great role-model for loving learning and being a continual learner. How fun to work in a bookstore. Thanks for this post, Linda.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The bookstore is really a delight, Deb. Thanks for the comment about being a role model. Hope so!

      Delete
  9. I love how this was a natural way to learn about dictionaries. I love old ones. My kids laugh at me but it is fun to look for words. I love that you are working in this book store. What a great job to have -except the desire to bring books home!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To think that this one was a high school student's dictionary. It's quite dense, but obviously well loved. Yes, the bookstore is wonderful. Thanks, Joanne.

      Delete
  10. The learning that sticks seems to come from the desire to know. I think Ingrid is a perfect example of that. You have tweaked her interest in words. I know you will find just the right dictionary for her.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That scholastic one that Jane mentions above looks very good. I agree, when we want to know, it will stay, and we'll be so much more excited! Thanks, Elsie.

      Delete
  11. How exciting that she wants a dictionary!
    When teaching, I had a yellow dictionary that was good for students in grade one, though really, they move on to needing an adult dictionary very early, because of the difficulty of words in the books read to them and the limited vocabulary in the early dictionaries.
    I think I had Merriam Websters Primary Dictionary or their Elementary Dictionary. (it was a different color though)
    http://www.amazon.com/Merriam-Websters-Primary-Dictionary-Merriam-Webster/dp/0877791740
    I liked it because it was not a picture dictionary, but was in the right format as a true adult dictionary.
    The Scholastic ones are good too (as mentioned above). Their "First Dictionary" looks good, but might be outgrown too soon.
    Thanks for the heads up that I may have to grab a dictionary again for those grandkids. I loved dictionaries when I was a child.
    I envy your work in a bookstore! That would be great. My mother and father had an antique store and my mom took care of organizing all the old books. That's where my attraction to books and old bookstores began. I wonder if we have one around here...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Donna, I appreciate the recommendations. My brother and sister-in-law own an antique store & keep wanting me to join them for a book section. It is an inviting idea.

      Delete
  12. Now there is a seed for a story: a granny working in a bookstore spreading knowledge and magic. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aw, thanks, Terje. That is a neat idea, & the problem is I need to settle on one!

      Delete
  13. Work in a bookstore, and grandchildren at hand...this sounds pretty perfect, Linda!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I'm delighted by Ingrid's curiosity about the dictionary.
    I concur with Terje! "A granny working in a bookstore spreading knowledge and magic" has the makings of a great picture book. You should write it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is an idea to ponder for sure, Stacey. Thanks for the extra support.

      Delete
  15. My daughter found a huge two volume dictionary at a sale for me. I have it in my classroom and call it the "Big Whopping Dictionary." Now I know I will keep it for this very time with grandchildren.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love it, that "Big Whopping Dictionary", so fun! We had an Oxford in our area at school, fascinating to dig into it.

      Delete
  16. Linda, I always loved dictionaries as I grew up and still do as an adult. Now I use an electronic one but still love the feel of my old Webster Dictionary. I love your stories of Ingrid and her curious little self.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Carol, I use one online now too, but this has made me interesting in a print on again. It's just wonderful to browse the pages.

      Delete
  17. Love the pictures of the old dictionary! My mom had a big old dictionary that I always used growing up, and this post makes me think of flipping through that old thing while doing my homework in elementary & middle school! Now I'm an internet dictionary girl though!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know, as I said above, this has me interested in just turning through the pages again. Thanks, Jennifer.

      Delete

Having a conversation is a good thing!