Thursday, January 12, 2017

Poetry Friday - What We Believe

         Poetry Friday today is with Keri at Keri Recommends. Thanks, Keri! Hope your trip today was good!



         I'm continuing to write for Mary Lee's #haikuforhealing and Catherine's #commonplace marvels. It's a special part of my day to choose something I noticed, writing about something I want to remember.

          I visit Denver's Museum of Nature and Science nearly every week with my youngest granddaughter, Imogene, five years old. I pick her up at school, and we stop at the museum on the way to my house. We stay only about an hour or so, grab a snack at the snack bar, and then Imi chooses where to go each time. The museum is amazing, and we continue to find different places we haven't examined closely. This past week, that place was the one that displayed information about evolution. It's not easy to try to explain this concept to a five-year-old. I focused on major changes, from the beginnings billions of years ago (there is a video showing earth changing) and different animals' evolving in this most recent time up to today. Imi is always interested in what I tell her, and we examine the details of the dioramas, looking for things we know and don't know. I'm not sure what sticks with her for future learning, but she continues to ask good questions. This time, two appear to fit our general conversation. She asked: "I wonder when any of them (animals) got their teeth? They would need them for eating." and "How would it be if we lived with those big dinosaurs? We'd have to live in deep holes to hide."



          I'm sharing because even my mind was whirling after leaving with the thoughts of vast changes through billions of years, a concept really beyond a five-year-old. But she will "get it" eventually, I know. For now, it's a start, and it was also nice when we left to see the moon rising, something that has changed little. Hence, this haiga. (I do wonder if my need for something stable has to do with our government changes?)
          FYI--I searched and discovered one recent article that speaks to this, but to us in this modern era, the moon appears steady, right?


inside the museum,
learning nature's changes 
outside, reliable moon

 Linda Baie © All Rights Reserved

50 comments:

  1. I love reading your haikus. I must get back to noticing. It is like a little prayer for the universe.

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    1. Thanks, Julianne. It has been a fun challenge.

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  2. The moon is spectacular this week in Denver. I rote my haiku about that last night too. I love your last line.

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    1. I'm sorry it was so cloudy last night, but yes, I've loved it all week! Thanks,Carol.

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  3. What a lovely response to being inside the museum. I don't write a haiku daily....but when I'm kinda lonely for something to write about I'll scratch out a haiku. You are a tremendous grandmother. I love what you share about learning from your grands. Have a great week.

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    1. Thanks, Linda. The museum has been quite a wonderful adventure with Imi. And that "wolf moon" this week, awesome.

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  4. Linda, I love how writing haiku has become a touchstone for you! I also love Imi's wonderings in the museum... a big hole indeed! The moon was beautiful here in Alabama last night... an Alabama poet-friend wrote a poem with a contrasting idea to what you present here that still sticks with me about the love-interest in the poem being "constant sun" to his "fickle moon." I've always related to THAT moon. :) Happy poetry Friday! xo

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    1. Thanks for sharing that 'extra' viewpoint, Irene. I've been very interested recently in examining different points of view, and how that makes our world both exciting and challenging. That moon this week-amazing! Glad to hear you loved it too in Alabama!

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  5. Love the haiku! Funny I was listening to a story on NPR this morning that was talking a bit about when animals started developing jaws. Teeth had to come pretty soon then, eh?

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    1. Amazing when there are connections like this, Katie. I'll see if I can find that online! Thank you!

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  6. Linda, I love how Imi always wonders. Has she gone to Wonderopolis to pose her questions? Every child receives an answer from Wonderopolis. The haiga is a reminder that nature is a constant as opposed to the fluctuating viewpoints in life.

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    1. She isn't doing much on the computer yet, but maybe we'll try it together, Carol. Thanks for the idea of nature's constancy, mostly true at least in our expectations. Sometimes surprises!

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    2. Let me know what Imi thinks about Wonderopolis.

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  7. What a treat for Imi and for you to go to that amazing museum EVERY week! Wow! Her questions tell me she is beyond her 5 years - thanks to an engaged grandmother like you, Linda.
    Love your haiga - the always reliable moon is of great comfort to many when we choose to look up. =)

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    1. The museum is just a short distance between Imi's school & my home, & I keep dual membership. It's a pleasure for us both. Until I moved it was a big deal to go "into" the city for a museum day. Now I belong to most of them, and several are very close. I am lucky, and it seems to be Imi's passion, at least now. Yes, that moon is a mainstay in my life. Thanks, Bridget!

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  8. Regardez la lune.

    It really has been something this week. Allegedly not a super moon, but it sure seems like one.

    Love the haiku!

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    1. Merci! Perhaps the cold has had something to make that moon so gorgeous?

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  9. I'm jealous of your museum visits with your granddaughter. They sound like an amazing opportunity together. What I love about the moon is that is stays constant even as it constantly changes throughout the lunar cycle. And yes, I, too, am feeling the need for something constant these days.

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    1. Happy to hear that you agree about that constancy. We will look for things that keep us steady! Thanks, Kay.

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  10. I enjoyed this haiku from being inside and how the outside matters too but more importantly I loved reading about your weekly routine with your granddaughter, how FUN!

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    1. Thanks, Mandy. The visits are special, and this one was really interesting. I need to find a "beginner's" evolution book!

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  11. Ah, yes, that amazing reliable moon.

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    1. It is, and I look for it often in each month. Thanks,Margaret.

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  12. What a special time you describe with your granddaughter. I'm sure she'll retain much you tell her (though she may not recall why she knows so much!). Enjoy the moon. Realizing I look at the same moon you do is also a lovely thought.

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    1. I think there is a picture book about everyone seeing the same moon, and that is a good thought I agree, Violet. Yes, I cherish these times with the grand-girls just as I did when my grandson was younger. I see him less, but it's good with him, too. Thanks!

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  13. What a wonderful experience with your granddaughter! I adore natural history museums and always try to visit them whenever I can - the natural world is always full of the most amazing inspiration!!

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    1. Thanks, Jane, it is a wonderful thing that we have this great museum so accessible. I love every bit just as Imi does.

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  14. Lovely haiku, Linda. On the way to school this morning, I enjoyed the moon hanging over the NYC skyline. I love it that no matter where we are (barring clouds) we all enjoy the "same moon" ... for me, that is a comforting link to loved ones I am geographically separated from.

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    1. It is a nice thought that I'm looking at the moon hanging over the trees across the way, and you're seeing it against that lovely skyline! It was a good week for this moon! Thanks, Alice!

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  15. These inspiring views of the moon are free for all. I hadn't thought of the moon as reliable, but darn if it isn't. I may not look at it the same again.

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    1. Thanks, Brenda, one part of nature that we all love.

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  16. I saw that same moon, setting in the west, as I headed off to school yesterday. Its predictable patterns calm me, as does the sight of the warrior Orion looking over us.

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    1. Yes! The stars, too, Mary Lee! I see that belt hanging low each evening. Thanks for the reminder.

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  17. Your haiku reminds me of Whitman's famous poem, "When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer." https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/45479

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  18. Thank goodness for the reliable moon. Last night I waited for the wolf moon of Friday the 13th to rise up and inspire me. As usual, the moon did not disappoint! Thank you for sharing your moon poem with us.

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    1. It was gorgeous, yes, it was! Glad you found it, Kiesha!

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  19. Beautiful haiku, Linda. You have a true poet's heart. xoxo

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  20. What wonderful paths you open up for your grandchildren, dear Linda (ever the teacher) and how lovely for you to join in their curiosity (ever the student). The moon at the coast a couple of nights ago was glorious as well. [Been thinking of you this weekend - Morgan is in and around Denver for her best friend's "bridesmaids weekend"; they went dog-sledding yesterday!]

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    1. Thanks, Robyn, love hearing about the moon down your way, too! Morgan's weekend sounds like a grand adventure! Happy Sunday!

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  21. I love the reliable moon. It's been so gorgeous the last couple of nights!

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    1. Thanks, Ruth, I like hearing that you've loved it too!

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  22. I'm so enjoying the photos you post from the museum. The giant snake one was a hoot! Keeps me smiling.

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  23. Science museums are where it's at, Linda. Lucky for your grands they have you to guide them.
    This is a calm poem with a lovely image you took.
    What if a cloud passed by (as happens often here in Tallahassee) & covered that reliable moon? (To take you up on your idea of looking close at differing ideas...
    I love this thought-provoking post.

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    1. I appreciate your idea, Jan. It may call for a second haiku-point of view.

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  24. Your "reliable moon" reminded me of this, from one of my favorite singers... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2ctc971Urg

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    1. Thanks, Matt. I watched it. New to me, and the song, the video are beautiful. Ah, time, but still the moon!

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  25. Your haiku is beautiful. I took a picture of the daytime moon last week. It was so pretty.

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