Tuesday, March 21, 2017

#DOL17 - 22/31 - Not Political, Well, Maybe!

 

SOLC #22/31 - 
      I'm slicing with the Two Writing Teachers community for Day Twenty-Two of Thirty-One of the Slice of Life Challenge in March.  Thank you, Stacey, Beth, Deb, Betsy, Lanny, Kathleen, Lisa, and Melanie.  

                                          Nine Days To Go!


              And, Thanks to Alyson Beecher's Non-Fiction Picture Book Challenge at Kidlit Frenzy.  

     I have a second post today about a new middle-grade book, and it's a giveaway, too. Go here to read all about it!  Comment by Sunday!

----------------------------

       As you see above I said this is not a political post, but in considering non-fiction texts, and the political events in our most recent history, I guess it really is political. After reading this book, I know that Martin W. Sandler, with so many other historical non-fiction authors, has written TRUTH, with sources, footnotes of explanation and extraordinary care to point out stereotypes that are not true.
        For example, the notion that pirates buried their treaure and created maps to remember where was created by Robert Louis Stevenson in his book Treasure Island, and has been kept alive in other books through the years as well as in movies. It is a myth that has never been proved.


         Another myth also shown to be incorrect is the way pirates spoke. The book states; "It's simply not true. . .one man can be credited for having created the fictitious pirate speak--the British actor Robert Newton. In 1950, he played Long John Silver in the movie version of Long John Silver and went on to play him in a television series in which he popularized the accent and many of the sayings that are commonly associated with pirates today." No more "ahoy, matey" or "Arrrrr". 
        Not only is this a wonderful look at pirates of long ago, how they became pirates and how they really lived, but it traces the history of the pirate who acquired the biggest fortune
ever with his fleet of ships, and it carries the history forward with the exciting find of this large ship, the Whydah which sank in the treacherous waters of Cape Cod. This was a ship with a treasure so large it is hard to believe the tales. Archaeologists use the artifacts to show the lives of pirates on board and to see the goods stolen. They were not only gold, but goods  transported to the new world that were needed, like fabric, tea, spices and wine.
        Sandler begins with a description of this famous ship that started its career as a slave ship and then tells the tale of its final owner, Black Sam Bellamy. Some of his actions earned
him the name Robin Hood of the Seas, but he was not only that. He began with a love of the sea and joined the British Navy, but soon became a bigger adventurer because his higher goal in life was to become rich. With some compatriots, he went off to find the treasures from ships. 
        Within various chapters lie “extra” pieces that add to the pirates’ tales and later to modern day treasure hunters. One of these extra parts explains the “Articles of Agreement” 
that all pirates signed in order to be on a ship’s crew.  If you agreed, you were “on the 
account” and expected to follow all the rules. If not, you could lose your life or be put ashore 
on a deserted island. 
          Another part explained what historians believe is the origin of the “Jolly Roger” that pirate’s flag we all know.  Toward the end of the book, we are moved to modern times and 
talk of the artifacts and how they are preserved, what they tell us of the "truth" of pirate life. 
The book is an extraordinary look at this early part of our history in America, the lives of various parts of society, but especially how people lived as pirates and what people thought of them.  Thanks to Candlewick Press for this advanced copy!
        How wonderful it would be to have a student read this book, or to read parts of it with a class and to discuss the research to discover the truth of pirates. And then to extend that to what they hear, what they read and how to find their own truths.

       "Truth, like gold, is to be obtained not by its growth, but by washing away from it all that is not gold. ~ Leo Tolstoy

40 comments:

  1. Sounds so interesting! Especially the part about pirate speak. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was quite detailed about this particular pirate, his rise to fame, and the sinking, then the "find". I enjoyed it a lot!

      Delete
  2. that sounds really interesting to read!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is, but I do love n-f books too. Thanks!

      Delete
  3. I'll have to keep that title in mind the next time I do a unit on pirates. Thanks for sharing all the interesting non-facts.

    https://wordsmithing2017.wordpress.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It will be wonderful with a unit about pirates. It was fascinating! Thanks, Heidi!

      Delete
  4. This title is new to me, Linda - but what I love most about your post is what you invite us to do with our students at the end. Thank you...and now to look for it and plan just such work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think you could use parts of it as mentors, Tara. It is full of small pieces to consider. Thanks!

      Delete
  5. This book is new to me, thank you! And TRUTH...who ever thought that it would turn into a political issue like it has. Sigh...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know, Michelle. The way this book was written struck me time and again about the support the author gave for his "facts". I was excited! Thanks!

      Delete
  6. All cliches are like accordions .. you have pull the bellows to hear the full sound. I love how you explore the elements of perceptions, and the "truth" behind it. Or "a truth."
    Kevin

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Love your analogy, Kevin. Exploring in research can be inspiring and eye-opening to see what is found. Thanks!

      Delete
  7. This is a tremendous model for what historians do (or should do). Look for artifacts and discover our truths.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, I think so. There are others, but the way this was written would help those modeling use parts in various ways.

      Delete
  8. That's interesting! I really didn't know they were more myths than truths. I have too much blind trust in the printed word....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And there were others shared, too, Michele. It was an interesting book! Thanks!

      Delete
  9. Trump has made everything politics for us now. But love the pirate pov.
    Bonnie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know, and it saddens me how much the chaos colors my life. But it can't be ignored, either! Thanks, Bonnie.

      Delete
  10. I love nonfiction texts like this that help young people discover how exciting history can be, and actual history, not just the versions they see on TV or in movies! As the saying goes, "truth is stranger than fiction", and that's something I wish more young readers could experience!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wish that, too, Jane, and the recent wonderful books published are helping teachers do that. Look at all the Sibert winners! Thanks!

      Delete
  11. I have always been fascinated by pirates. What little boy hasn't? This sounds like an interesting read, even though it will shatter my childhood fantasies of what a pirate is and how they behaved.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know about those shattered myths, thinking about George Washington & that cherry tree! Wish you lived down the block so I could give this to you! Thanks!

      Delete
  12. I won this book in a give away at our regional SCBWI conference. It's on my table, but no one has picked it up to read yet. I like your idea of comparing the facts with what myths we learned about pirates. A good lesson, Aye Aye!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So glad you have the book, and will enjoy it, or use it with students. Thanks, Margaret.

      Delete
  13. Fascinating comparisons to what I 'know' about pirates - clearly, what I know is fiction. Love the quote by Leo Tolstoy, one of my favorite authors. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Maureen, happy you liked the quote, and yes, I didn't know about all these myths, either.

      Delete
  14. Linda, This is fascinating. Just the kind of book that my husband the avid reader would have liked. We carry so many misconceptions about many topics. I bet this would appeal to all kids. Thank you.
    PS: I love bleeding hearts. They remind me of my mother.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love them too, Barbara, like all blooms, they seem like miracles to me. That's fun to know that you're husband would have loved the book. I do like n-f books, too, find them always interesting. Thanks!

      Delete
  15. This book sounds like it would work well with Candace Fleming's new biography of Buffalo Bill, where she digs into the myths and explores where the truth and fiction lie.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I still have not read that title, Annette, and have been to our Buffalo Bill museum a long time ago, but sadly remember little. Thanks for the tip!

      Delete
  16. Also, the flowers on your header make me so happy! Ready for spring in our neck of the woods!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. It was time for a change, and a welcome to spring. The picture was last year's but those bleeding hearts are on their way!

      Delete
  17. This sounds interesting! I can already think of some students who would love to absorb all of those facts about pirates!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great! I hope you find it for them. As you can see, I enjoyed it very much. Thanks!

      Delete
  18. This sounds like a fabulous resource and I love your suggestion at the end. Thank for this post and all the work that went into it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome, Anita. I wanted to be sure that people could see what a good book it is.

      Delete
  19. Truth is not the opposite of fake. I think of this given the rhetorical and political climate we live in. How important it is to read and especially to read widely.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, also to model for students and/or just other friends. I don't want to depend on just one source. Thanks, Mary Ann.

      Delete
  20. I have this on a shelf at home, and now I am excited to read it! I mean, it looks good on its own ;) but you helped!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you like it when you get to it, Nicole! As you can see, I thought it was fascinating and such a good model for research and good stories from that. Thanks!

      Delete

Having a conversation is a good thing!