Monday, May 29, 2017

Imagination Inspiration

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         I love windows, pictures of windows, sketching windows, doors too. And I love imagining what's going on inside those windows. A recent picture book I read is about a Mama Rabbit carrying her little bunny home. On the way they see lighted windows and the people in them, imagining a little more than what they see. The book is The Way Home In The Night written and illustrated by Akiko Miyakoshi. I'm in the midst of writing a picture book story that involves numerous characters, so when I read the book, I connected especially to those lit windows, imagining my own characters and what I might see if I "peeked" through each child's window. I've begun taking notes about each one, drawing a window, putting the notes "inside" the window of what I create about the particular child. 
         As a writer, I question all the time, and am wondering if that's what you who are reading do, too, when you write? Sometimes that questioning voice is tiring, and I want it to stop, and simply say "Okay, just let those words stay." When I re-read what I've written, I also wonder and wonder, "Is this enough? How much more is needed? What is it I want readers to understand?" See, more questions! 
          That's how my life is slicing lately, lots of writing, lots of questions, with a bit of cleaning in between and some good times with the family. Also, lots of looking in windows!

photo credit: hans pohl Monsaraz via photopin (license)

14 comments:

  1. I like thinking about everything as a window.

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  2. Linda, I am so excited about your new venture. I think the window angle is one that holds much promise. I wish I could peek through your draft and see what wonderful characters and stories you have in mind. Best of luck. I look forward to hearing more.

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    1. I am excited about this project, so thanks for the support, Carol. I suspect I have a lot of writing to do, then revision, too!

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  3. I love the idea of actually drawing windows in which to place thoughts, notes, and imaginings for each child! My own thoughts today are swirling around children and the impact my efforts have on them. Thank you for a slice recognizing all the questions we have!

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    1. Yes! Those questions won't go away, and in the classroom, too, Tim. I hope that the sketches will help the writing!

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  4. Windows and doors of others always intrigue me too. I'm sure my imagination does not match up with reality behind the windows and doors.

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    1. I remember that you've written about imagining what's "behind" those windows, Elsie. And yes, my imagination goes a bit wild too. Thanks!

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  5. Sometimes it is so hard to quiet that inner voice. I think as teachers that questioning is what drives us to be better and find what works best for our students. As writers that questioning can take us to deeper depths in our writing. When to stop questioning? Never. When to put it on hold? Before we give out readers more than they need or can grasp at the moment. Look forward to hearing more about your writing journey.

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    1. Thanks for the advice, and I do agree, and welcome the questions nearly always.

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  6. Lots of writing and lots of questions sounds as a good combination when the questions don't start slowing down the writing. I wish you more - more writing, more questions, more imagination and more family time!

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    1. Thank you, Terje. I am delighted by your wishes.

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  7. Ah. Windows and mirrors. Perfect for wonderings and in between bathroom cleanings. Agree the questions never seem to have an end. I second Terje's wishes!

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    1. Thanks, Julieanne, I appreciate your thoughts.

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