Thursday, May 11, 2017

One Spring Fling & Question



       Tara Smith at A Teaching Life hosts our poetry Friday this week, with love in the air at her school. Thanks, Tara! 

               Spring, even early, makes me want to substitute its name for June in that old song from Carousel, "June (Spring) is bustin' out all over/All over the meadow and the hill!"  I often share how much we need rain, even to the extent of celebrating snow in April. But this week we are having rain! And the plants and trees have rarely looked greener. Flowers are 'bustin' out all over." 



                                              Wondering About Violets

Beginnings mystify
especially in spring.
How can this tiny seed keep
the secrets of 
violets?
I’m comforted to know
that it will never
become
a rose,
but is this comforting
for the violet?
Linda Baie ©All Rights Reserved



photo credit: Mabacam Sweet Violets via photopin (license)</a>

34 comments:

  1. Hi Linda, I like the question you end on. The perennial question, why am I me? Leads to so many other questions, too. I like that you use two flowers to illustrate that even while they are both flowers, they are different from each other, too.

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    1. Thanks, Brenda, looking at the different blooms and wondering about their feelings was fun to do. And I am amazed that seeds have all the ingredients, a miracle really.

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  2. Yea for rain (Though we might be reaching our saturation point here in Indiana) and the flowers they bring! I love the idea of tiny seeds keeping the secrets of their flowers. Even though each is different, they all offer beauty.

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    1. Thanks, Kay, & yes, I imagine you have had more moisture than we have! Here's to sunshine for you!

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  3. I think the violet is totally happy to be a violet. Just as we should all be happy and comforted to be ourselves. Love the mysteries of the tiny seeds and the colors of spring.

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    1. Thanks, and I think each one of us should be happy with who we are, too, Ramona.

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  4. Oh, our yard is simply littered with violets! When Henry was little, he would pick them for salads. Maybe we will do that this weekend. I adore these sweet faces and the question you pose about them in your poem today. xx

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    1. Happy to hear of your delightful violets, too, Amy. Thanks for sharing with me, and about Henry!

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  5. Call me silly, but I always think of roses as being haughty and maybe even a bit snobbish, perhaps because of all the attention that's showered on them, while violets are merry and friendly and just happy to be alive in this great world of ours. :-)

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    1. I guess each flower holds its own qualities. My words were meant to consider those thoughts, perhaps by humans, too. Thanks, Jane.

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  6. Violets are my father's favorite flower. :) Glad you're getting rain and things are greening up. I always thought it was pretty miraculous how tiny seeds knew who they were going to be all along.

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    1. To look at some seeds, often similar, and know that the growth will differ in startling ways is amazing to me, too. Thanks, Jama, love knowing that your father loves violets.

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  7. How refreshing to wonder about the violet's perspective! I would rather be a violet than a rose any day. :) Happy Mother's Day, Linda. I think those violets are blooming just for you. :)

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    1. Thanks, Michelle. It was fun to write from this POV.

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  8. I'm anxiously awaiting our violets to appear. (Just dandelions at the moment!) Thank you for sharing yours! -- Christie @ https://wonderingandwondering.wordpress.com/blog/

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    1. You're welcome, Christi. Hoping for your blooms to appear soon!

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  9. You make us consider the self-esteem of a flower...which I don't know if I've ever done! Well done!

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    1. Ha! Thanks, Matt. I love violets and as you see, amazed about those seeds, too, so it was interesting to ponder this question.

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    2. Aw, sweet! This violet never dreams of becoming a rose, just so you know. (But when I was little, I wanted my name to be Susan. I was always dark - dark hair, brown eyes - and felt that a Violet should be pale and blond. We called gaillardia Brown-eyed Susan, and that's why I wanted my name to be Susan.)

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  10. I love the photo and the poem. Why would a violet want to be a rose?

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  11. The violet is such a striking flower and your image certainly does it justice, Linda. Say yes, to placing this combo in my spring gallery. "Beginnings mystify" is a wonderfully, enticing opening!

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  12. I think the violets are very happy just as they are, they are the early ones that bring us out of our winter stupor. Lovely violet poem Linda!

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  13. So much to love -- the quote in your header (I miss my bleeding hearts...need to plant more!), the perspective in your violet photo, and your questions of flower identity and seed miracles.

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  14. We found out our new kitty likes violets! https://www.instagram.com/p/BRwUbDmBWba/?taken-by=onedeepdrawer Peace keep you, Linda!

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  15. Seeds really are a mystery! I think there's a lot to that with children, too - you can influence them, but ultimately, they are who they are.

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  16. Thanks everyone. I've been out all day, at the bookstore and celebrating Mother's Day early. I appreciate hearing your ideas about these violets, and from our own Violet Nesdoly and her name's story. Have a wonderful Sunday wherever you are and whatever you do.

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  17. Indeed, seeds are a mystery. I remember a spring at the ranch when the wildflowers were profuse... breathtaking in their beauty and abundance. I wondered where all those seeds had hidden themselves for so many years.

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  18. We have violets everywhere right now and I love them. I never considered that they weren't happy being their own sweet selves, but it is a thought-provoking question. Thank you for sharing, Linda!

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  19. What beauties violets are. They help see the strength and magic of tiny things. Love the last line question. I want to try that this week

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  20. Beautiful poem Linda! Thank you for inspiring me to keep noticing what's going on around me - always so much writing inspiration in these things.

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  21. Glad that your flowers are busting out, Linda! I like the mystery in your poem, the secrets of beginnings. Happy Mother's Day!

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  22. Beautiful, Linda. I wonder about the same thing. How can a seed hold everything it needs to make a plant, a flower, the vegetables we eat?

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  23. Tiny poem with big questions, Linda! Thanks for the reminder to slow down and think about how the tiny things in life feel. =)

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  24. The Berlin Boxing Club is one of my all-time favorites! There is so much to discuss with this book!

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Having a conversation is a good thing!