Thursday, November 9, 2017

Poetry Friday - It's Personal

          Jama Rattigan of Jama's Alphabet Soup is hosting today, delighting us with tasty, yes!, donuts! If you do not prefer this sweet or partake only once in a long while, she offers a poem and an entire book of donut poems! Thanks for hosting, Jama!



          As most of you know, Michelle H. Barnes at Today's Little Ditty hosts another poet nearly every month who then offers a poetic challenge to anyone who wishes to write to it. Here is the post for this month and the challenge from Carol Hinz, Editorial Director of Millbrook Press and Carolrhoda Books, divisions of Lerner Publishing Group: Returning to my favorite quote from earlier, I would like your readers to write a poem that finds beauty in something that is not usually considered beautiful. The quote Carol refers to is "It’s startling how I start to see the beauty in things that I was taught not to see beauty in."

                                 —STEiNUNN

      Here is one idea: 



It’s Personal

Denied - appreciation until - the respiration
of a baby’s gasp and cry,
when we wheeze and gulp and sigh,
or in loss, we say goodbye.

We ignore this bashful beauty -
a mistake we shouldn’t make.
Whisper “thank you” when you wake
for every breath you take.
Linda Baie ©All Rights  

photo credit: megan leetz via photopin (license)


32 comments:

  1. What a wonderful response Linda. A someone who struggles to wake up, I think I'll be more mindful when I do so, now.

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  2. So true, we don't appreciate when things in our body are working well, only noticing when there's a hitch. I like the way your hyphens echo trouble breathing.

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    1. Thanks, Tabatha. This came about when I had to lie very still at the dentist, thinking about a lot of things, but noticing my breathing.

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  3. When every breath is beautiful, we are so unaware of it. Thanks, I think I'll remember to be thankful today, Linda!

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    1. You're welcome, Donna, it is good to be aware sometimes.

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  4. So true that we take breathing for granted, Linda... our bodies in general until the moment when something goes wrong. Thanks for this terrific take on our November challenge!

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    1. You're welcome, Michelle. I will try again, I think. This came up as a surprise.

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  5. Yes, so very true how we take breath for granted. Things that are automatic (like the beating of our heart)are easiest to discount, until there's a problem. As Tabatha said, great use of hyphens.

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    1. Thanks, Jama, we don't notice, at least usually.

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  6. So many times we take ordinary things like our breath for granted. Thank you for the reminder to be aware and to be grateful.

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    1. You're welcome, Kay. I'm glad to be a reminder.

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  7. Thanks for this deep and moving poem Linda. I have had times when my breathing has been difficult, and am very conscious of when my breathing is going well–it's wonderful and I value it.

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    1. You're welcome, Michelle. I'm glad to hear your story, too.

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  8. A very thoughtful take on the challenge, Linda. And it brings to mind some recent reading on meditation I've borrowed from Jeff's nightstand - a Thich Nhat Hanh book (several lying around the house!); paraphrasing probably, one suggestion is these simple thoughts: "Breathing in, I notice it's an in breath; breathing out, I notice it's an out breath." That has helped me in a recent spate of hectic weeks!

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    1. I have read enough of Thich Nhat Hanh that it could have influenced me, too. The book I pick up most often is titled "You Are Here", and talks about calm noticing. I probably should have said something in the intro. This came about while lying long & quietly at the dentist, so I began to write in my head, noticing the breathing as I lay there. Thanks, Robyn!

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  9. Great reminder to slow down our thoughts so they match our breathing. Lovely poem, Linda. =)

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    1. Thank you, and if only we could slow down some of the time, Bridget.

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  10. It's funny how you were inspired by a dentist's visit. I hate going to the dentist, and the last time I went (last Tuesday), I ended up using a mudras I had come across for anxiety. Just in trying to keep my fingers in the right position kept my mind off the killer hygienist!

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    1. I love hearing that you had a similar experience, Diane. Yes, my thoughts travel when I'm lying there. Thanks!

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  11. This reminds me of Seth Godin's post about winning yoga races.

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    1. I will look for it, Mary Lee, don't know it. Winning yoga races is something we might all aspire to! Thanks!

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  12. Wow! That baby's gasp and cry got me in the gut. This is a keeper!

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    1. Thanks, Margaret. The inspiration begins when Michelle's guests get me thinking!

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  13. Great response to the prompt!

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  14. I have a father-in-law with an incurable lung disease. None of us take breathing for granted any more. Very moving poem.

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    1. I'm sorry to hear this, Brenda. Hugs to you and your family, and thank you for sharing.

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  15. As someone with a chronic lung condition I can readily say that when you can't breathe, nothing else matters! It's all too easy to take our good health for granted, when it's such a blessing.

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    1. Thanks for sharing your story, Jane.

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  16. This is a wonderful reminder of one of the small but essential things we should be thankful for. Thanks for pointing out the beauty with such beautiful words.

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    1. You're welcome, Penny. And thanks for coming by.

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