Thursday, February 26, 2015

Poetry Friday- "Sounding" The End of February

           The wonderful Heidi Mordhorst of My Juicy Little Universe is our host for Poetry Friday, and the last thing I heard from her is that she was hearing murmurs from those bulbs "below below/the frozen ground" in a poem titled Nine Below. I hope that warmth has finally come her way! From reading her post for Poetry Friday, looks as if she's going to be celebrating her birthday month of March with a great challenge, too. Head on over for more from her, and to all the other poetry links.

         Poets are winding up this birthday month of Laura Shovan, Author Amok. I've had a great time writing, and imagine that Laura enjoyed her birthday "gifts".  I certainly did. One more poem on Saturday, then March arrives-hopefully like a lion so I can believe that spring will arrive soon. Here is another poem I wrote this month, the sound to me of a bit of a ringing rat-a-tat-tat!


        In addition to writing poems, I also celebrated Laura Purdie Salas' new poetry book A Rock Can Be here. And Matt Forrest Esenwine at Radio, Rhythm & Rhyme reviewed it this week, too! It's  coming out Sunday, the long wait is over, and time to find this next beautiful book in her series! You can find more about it here!

Old Things

In a tiny wooden cabinet
in my grandmother’s house
sat a tinkly drumming toy
rat-a-tatted by a mouse.

At its side I wound the key,
and pressed the tab for ‘go’.
The mouse’s arms moved up and down,
performing tin drum shows.

Time moved on; Grandmother died,
But I found the little toy
I played it with my memories,
of when I was a boy.
 Linda Baie ©All Rights Reserved

The sound is here!

37 comments:

  1. Lovely poem Linda. It brought back memories of wind up toys - and of a favourite song from childhood, The Marvellous Toy.

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    1. Oh my, I taught my children that song, Sally, great Peter, Paul & Mary song. Thanks for reminding me!

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  2. Sweet poem, sweet memory. I still love wind up toys :)!

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    1. Thanks Jama-I have a small collection of those tiny ones-no others like these old ones, though. Fun to see!

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  3. Oh, I thought my grandmother's house (which would be appropriately deemed cluttered these days) was a treasure chest. It was! Thanks for sharing these lovely words which spark other memories. Love the line: "rat-a-tatted by a mouse." :0) (And bravo for you for all you do to play along in these great challenges. And all you do in general!)

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    1. Thanks Robyn, this challenge has been such fun, and inspiring, considering with whom I'm writing!

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  4. We have a few of my mother's childhood fools. This poem reminds me of them

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    1. Perhaps I should have my students bring in old toys of theirs to write about? Thanks Laura!

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  5. I have such good memories of my grandmother's house. She didn't have many toys, but I loved working the pedal on her sewing machine and going through the drawers of bobbins and buttons. A lovely memory poem, Linda.

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    1. All those special, & different, things. My early adolescent student like hearing about them too.

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  6. I wonder sometimes if the next generations will have any idea of how things work. Hardly anything is mechanical anymore. No fixing of wind up and gear toys now! No looking at the innards to figure out them out.
    Super flowing poem, Linda.

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    1. My students love 'making' things via simple machine concepts. They will know some of the ways, but those old toys. Perhaps I should show them some? Thanks, Donna.

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    2. I think it would be wonderful to show them some of those toys. See if they can figure out how they moved. Maybe pick up a box of old parts or broken mechanical toys and see what they could do? There could be some pictures and poems in that! I want to come play, too!

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    3. I do give my students a 'machine' assignment once in a while, but have never used the old toys as a "mentor"-will see what I can do, Donna! Thanks for the idea.

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  7. Dear Linda, what a treasure this poem (and its memory!) is! thank you for sharing. I love Laura's latest book... who knows what she will come up with next?? I, too, am ready for March. xo

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    1. Thanks, Irene. I'm glad you like Laura's book, too. Lots of parts to enjoy in them all!

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  8. You poem captures the sound and feelings of those old toys - I can hear the ratta-tat-tat now! =)

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  9. "I played it with my memories" <– so lovely! I don't have many grandparent memories... and certainly not like this, but my mother (who's an antiques dealer) used to have all sorts of this stuff in the bedroom where my kids slept when we came to visit. They loved it!

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    1. I love that your kids had those old toys to enjoy, too. My brother is an antique dealer, too, & he would probably enjoy these in his store! Thanks, Michelle.

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  10. Linda, this is a delightful poem that fits very nicely with the song. I did listen to that sound but never completed a poem. Thank you for sharing yours. Digging into my grandmother's treasures has revealed some pieces that are cherished.

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    1. There are so many things I both remember and have, great memories, Carol. Thank you.

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  11. That's lovely, Linda! Especially...
    "I played it with my memories,
    of when I was a boy."

    Still waiting on the warmth....

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    1. We're waiting, too, it was 0 degrees when I drove to work this am! Thanks, Heidi, will watch your own celebrating!

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  12. That is charming! It brings back memories for me. I can practically feel the pressure of turning the metal keys. I love that you made "rat-a-tatted" an excellent onomatopoetic verb.

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    1. Oh, that metal key. It could have been another part of the poem. I'm glad you reminded me, Karin. Thank you.

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  13. Lovely! Old toys are so special. They really don't make them like that any more and they provide such an immediate connection to the past.

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    1. My daughter and I are even lamenting the loss of the first Fisher-Price toys, which she loved & now her daughters have. These old metal toys are very special though.

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  14. How deeply poignant, dear Linda. There IS just something about old toys that evoke beautiful unforgettable memories.

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    1. Thank you Myra. It's not always the "good old days", but for these toys, good memories.

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  15. This is so sweet, Linda. I can see that little mouse "performing tin drum shows." Aren't we lucky to have so many special memories of our grandmothers?

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    1. Thanks, Catherine, yes, I spent many hours having fun at my grandparents' homes.

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  16. Very charming, Linda. And a bit wistful too!

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  17. Playing it with memories... loved that! We have my mother-in-law's old music box from when she was a little girl, and your poem makes me think of the times our kids would wind it up to listen and remember her by. These sound poems are such fun to listen in on, Linda - bravo to you all for jumping in and letting your poetic imaginations fly!

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    1. Thanks Tara, nice to hear about the music box, too!

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  18. I love those old wind up toys! I remember having a monkey with a drum similar to your mouse. Your poem was a delight to read and brought back memories of my grandfather and his "antique" toys. Thanks for this, Linda!

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