Monday, April 22, 2019

It's Monday - Lovable books

            Visit Kellee and Ricki at UnleashingReaders and Jen at Teach Mentor Texts to see what they've been reading, along with everyone else who post their favorites. 
        The winner of the giveaway of Superlative Birds by Leslie Bulion is Vicki Wilke!

       If you are interested, I'm writing a poem a day for poetry month, posting a second post on the days that I share reviews.




for Poetry Month - a new book by Laura Purdie Salas


        I've followed Laura's blog for a long time and have enjoyed her books and ideas for teaching poetry, too. Back in 2014, she wrote a poem a day for Poetry Month, I followed along and made a file of each, what she called, 'riddle-ku'. And I used them with students who loved writing their own. Now Laura has created a book of the seasons, just perfect for NOW because it starts with spring. Six riddles are included in each of the four seasons, beautifully clever new ways to see each part of our year and to crack the riddle. You'll need to get the book to discover the "wind bird", what has a "wicked whine", "a crispy crowd of loud crunch" and "knitted twins". Mercè López illustrates with subtle hints in vivid color, manages to show each riddle with beauty, including that gorgeous title riddle, "lion of the sky". I love the varied things that Laura shows in the seasons, not simply in nature, but activities found in them, too. Laura explains Riddle-Ku in an afterword and a list for further reading is also added.

        Except for the book above, Thanks to Candlewick Press for the following books. It's time for babies!


         The origin of Mercy Watson is "extraordinary", and now we have the pleasure of learning it, and how those closest handled it. Mrs. Watson had just expressed concern to Mr. Watson about their ordinary life when Mercy appears. I won't tell the story because you have to read it and delight all over again at the Watson's immediate love for a baby pig, for Eugenia Lincoln's grumpy, no surprise, response, and for Baby Lincoln's good neighbor actions. Hearing the back story of Mercy and those in her life is a wonderful thing to read.


        Those who know best recommend that new parents and baby spend time to rest and to know their new family recently made, a time named "babymoon". In lovely rhyming couplets, ones that are like a lullaby, Hayley Barrett sweetly tells of 'sunny naps' and 'reading stories' along with bringing a chuckle when she writes "We muddle through each new concern. Focusing on the baby snuggling, sleeping, looking along with the parents' happiness and amazement Juana Martinez-Neal brings pages of warmth into her illustrations plus much emotion in the parents' faces. The focus is on their 'babymoon', but in the background are bits and pieces the home itself. A seemingly disgusted cat sits on top a shelf with other items that mean home--a plant and books, a figurine and a picture. Along the way, still loving the family, the cat appears curious, comes closer. A dog is part of the family, too, lying close, content. By the end, the family has settled in all together, happy in their babymoon. It is a wonderful book, perfect for a young or new family.



        You might believe from the darling cover that this is an ABC book meant for babies, but no, Atinuke has crafted a baby book, but for only in this special story, the letter "B". Its a circular book, too, from Baby to Baba and back to Baba, then Baby again, and all the Beautiful Bounty one sees on a special trip. Don't miss Angela Brooksbank's gorgeous color illustrating this trip, favorites are the double-page spread with the baobab tree and the one where brother on his bike and baby in the banana basket ride by the Baboon. However, there is much to love on each page.



           I spent more than one part of a school year and then with trips with students studying sand hill cranes. They, along with other cranes, are quite special birds as you will discover when you read this poem story by Helen Frost illustrated with incredibly marvelous photographs by Rick Lieder. From sounds in the egg, through hatching, and finally flying off with their flock, they follow one baby crane growing up. The story is told by the babies themselves as they accompany the photos, as in this picture below. And more information about sandhill cranes is added at the back. 















Still Reading: Children of Blood and Bone. I did not find the time to finish this busy week! Whew, it's intense!


NPM19 - Day 22 - Predictions


Writing about my recent weather.

        The winner of the giveaway of Superlative Birds by Leslie Bulion is, Ta Da, Vicki Wilke!

Tabatha Yeatts has created a link to poems teachers and librarians can print for poetry month, titled "Poetry in The Halls". I'm grateful to be one of the poets!

Jama Rattigan has a post HERE with many poets' goals for April.

The Progressive Poem schedule can be found on the right.








Some Days

Last Thursday--predicted rain for Easter.
I thought about those who climbed to our Red Rocks
for a special sunrise service,
and little ones hunting eggs in newly green grass.
On Friday, they predicted a sunny Sunday morning
but a stormy afternoon.
On Saturday, temps rose to eighty
as predicted. 
Windows opened. I wore shorts.
We smelled summer’s perfumed air.
Sunday morning skies invited a walk in the sunshine,
but as predicted, the western skies darkened.
Rain clouds moved toward my side of the city.
I even took a picture of this predicted,
incoming,
needed
rain.
Sprinkles made patterns on the sidewalk,
a few drops glistened on the lilies.
I think I heard them take a sip.
And it stopped.
Yes, the prediction was correct.
They just did not predict
how much.

Linda Baie ©

FYI - Others did receive lots of rain, just not us!

Sunday, April 21, 2019

NPM19 - Day 21 - Again, Wordplay


Continuing with ideas from the past two posts!

        I have a giveaway of a new poetry book here. Be sure to enter! It's over tomorrow!

Tabatha Yeatts has created a link to poems teachers and librarians can print for poetry month, titled "Poetry in The Halls". I'm grateful to be one of the poets!

Jama Rattigan has a post HERE with many poets' goals for April.

The Progressive Poem schedule can be found on the right!





Day Twenty-One - wordplay 

      It's Easter. If you celebrate, I wish you a joyous day today. And because it's Easter, I thought I'd write one more poem from my playing with words.  

      Here is a brief piece from the History Channel that gives some history of the Easter symbols.



Scrambled

egg white
pie delight
egg nog
cream fog
egg head
mislead
egg roll
spice toll
eggplant
enchant
eggshell
chick cell
egg cup
dress up
egg hunt
bunny stunt


Linda Baie ©



photo credit: arbyreed Egg on Black Rocks via photopin (license)

Saturday, April 20, 2019

NPM19 - Day 20 - More Wordplay

Continuing with ideas from the book. This time, Wordplay

              I have a giveaway of a new poetry book here. Be sure to enter! It's almost over!

Tabatha Yeatts has created a link to poems teachers and librarians can print for poetry month, titled "Poetry in The Halls". I'm grateful to be one of the poets!

Jama Rattigan has a post HERE with many poets' goals for April.

The Progressive Poem schedule can be found on the right!






           I wrote something similar yesterday, wanted to try one more!



Pinning

pin prick
ouch, lick
pin drop
quiet stop
pin wheel
wind feel
pin hole
pic goal
pin head
unread
pin point
anoint
pinstripe
stereotype
pin ball
that’s all

Linda Baie ©

Friday, April 19, 2019

NPM19 - Day 19 - Wordplay With Hearts

It's Poetry Friday, the next to the final one in April! Amy Ludwig VanDerwater is our host on The Poem Farm, surely giving more information in her "poem story" about John and Betsy. She's kept us waiting each day on poetic cliffs to see what will happen next. Thanks for hosting, Amy!



   If you celebrate Easter or Passover, wishing you a joyous and peaceful time.

            I have a giveaway of a new poetry book here. Be sure to enter!

Tabatha Yeatts has created a link to poems teachers and librarians can print for poetry month, titled "Poetry in The Halls". I'm grateful to be one of the poets!

Jama Rattigan has a post HERE with many poets' goals for April.

The Progressive Poem schedule can be found on the right!

Continuing with ideas from the book. This time, wordplay


         One idea of wordplay, to me, is to go for a walk, this time around my house, to find something that stands out I might play with. I have a kind of bulletin board made of wire I found a few years ago that's filled with fun things I fancy - a felt banner I found a few years ago that says "celebrate", lots of snapshots, buttons, and birds in various forms, tiny drawings by Ingrid and Imogene. I hope you can imagine it. I stand and look sometimes, savoring the things that mean memories. Some favorites hanging there are hearts. Here's a small picture, and my poem having fun with "hearts".  



Heartfelt

heartthrob
will rob
heartstrings
broken wings
heartache
hard to take
heartbreak
teen ache
heartburn
adult turn
heart sick
never quick
heartsease
yes please

Linda Baie ©

extra - You may also know 'heartsease' as 'johnny jump-ups' or 'violas', some say 'wild pansies'.

Thursday, April 18, 2019

NPM19 - Day 18 - The Rooster

Continuing with ideas from the book. This time, More Animals  

              I have a giveaway of a new poetry book here. Be sure to enter!

Tabatha Yeatts has created a link to poems teachers and librarians can print for poetry month, titled "Poetry in The Halls". I'm grateful to be one of the poets!

Jama Rattigan has a post HERE with many poets' goals for April.

The Progressive Poem schedule can be found on the right!
not "the" rooster, but one I met long ago on a trip with students



The Rooster

My grandparents lived on a picture book farm.
On it sat a large house, a barn, smaller sheds for storage, 
and one long, low building—for the chickens.
Behind it was the outhouse, the outside bathroom.
Kept spotless by my grandmother, it even had wallpaper! 
My problem lay in its location,
out of the house yard, 
                                  through a gate, 
                                                        across the chicken yard.
If only the rooster would keep busy with the ladies!

I would watch and watch 
‘till he worried a worm instead of me, 
and race through the chicken yard to the outhouse, 
slam the door and latch it.
Whew!
After finishing what I went there for—
I prepared for the race back.

I peeped through a crack,
searched all around,
saw only some hens scratching for a bite.
I opened that creaky door preparing for flight, 
the rooster marched around the corner, 
like a drum major in a band.

I jumped back into the outhouse
and slammed the door
again.
I waited and looked.
I looked and waited.
So did the rooster.

Finally, my grandmother missed me. 
She came to the rescue, rushing at the rooster. 
“Shoo, shoo,” she shouted. He listened to her.
I hugged my grandmother, grabbed onto her hand,
and walked back to the house with her.

But all the time, I watched for that rooster.

Linda Baie ©

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

NF Picture Books Capture History

Visit Alyson Beecher on Wednesdays for Non-Fiction Picture Books at Kidlit Frenzy.  Thanks to her hosting and sharing and those who add their posts, you can discover and celebrate terrific nonfiction picture books!  I always learn from these books, am happy that they are more and more available today for children, for everyone!

            I'm offering a giveaway for another nf picture book here. This time, it's non-fiction poetry!

            Thanks, Candlewick Press, for these two fabulous books!



          When I started reading this book, I remembered watching a few 'shorts' from Charlie Chaplin on a television show a long time ago, thought they were fun, knew he was an entertainer long before my time, and my grandparents loved him. They thought it was amazing to see the 'moving pictures'. 
          There is much more to Charlie's story than his stardom as "The Tramp". Thanks to Gary Golio for telling the highlights of it in this book and to Ed Young for giving Gary's words Charlie's creative soul in fabulous multi-media pictures. This collaboration ends in a book to adore. Here's a sample from the start:



          Charlie, very young, lived in a nice house with plenty to eat, but that was before his father left and his mother's voice quit. No longer able to make a living, Charlie, his mother, and older brother Sydney, all lived in one room. His mother became ill, and off to the poorhouse they went. Charlie spent much of his young life begging, but he had an added talent, his mother had taught him songs,  read stories and acted them out, too. He learned to dance and sing for pennies! The book states, "Outside a pub/Where a sad face and two happy feet/Earned him enough/For a toasted tea cake with jam./Ahhh. . ."  Charlie's other parts on stage and his keen observations began to show him what actors do to entertain, make people laugh and cry, with words and movement! 

NPM19 - Day 17 - Animals

Continuing with ideas from the book. This time, Animals and a cinquain

              
I have a giveaway of a new poetry book here. Be sure to enter!

Tabatha Yeatts has created a link to poems teachers and librarians can print for poetry month, titled "Poetry in The Halls". I'm grateful to be one of the poets!

Jama Rattigan has a post HERE with many poets' goals for April.


The Progressive Poem schedule can be found on the right!




my horse, Mariah

pleasure…
the coat that’s soft,
nuzzle with a nicker,
beloved scent like no other -
pony

Linda Baie ©


Tuesday, April 16, 2019

NPM19 - Day 16 - Questions

 Pausing from the book. This time, Mid-month questions.

      I have a giveaway of a new poetry book here today. Be sure to enter!

      


Tabatha Yeatts has created a link to poems teachers and librarians can print for poetry month, titled "Poetry in The Halls". I'm grateful to be one of the poets!

Jama Rattigan has a post HERE with many poets' goals for April.


The Progressive Poem schedule can be found on the right!





If A Parade Passes by

Life’s film rolls before my eyes
waiting for words
to blacken the page
capturing images 
without the IPhone.
Inside and outside frustration.
My pencil stops,
starts,
stops.
How will I show these trunks
blackened with snow
standing in opposition
to their green grass skirts?
What melodic metaphor can I use
to sketch the courageous squirrel
highstepping on power lines
across six lines of rush?
When will the letters gather
to parade the morning for you?
Here in morning silence,
I imagine I hear a few toots.


Linda Baie ©

A Giveaway Is Flying Your Way!

        Thanks to Peachtree Publishers, I have the pleasure of offering a giveaway of this marvelous book, Superlative Birds by Leslie Bulion and Robert Meganck. With poems that vary (just like birds) in using the facts to tell about the birds who are the biggest, loudest, stinkiest, fastest, and more, here is the book for bird lovers, enhanced with extraordinary illustrations, both realistic and humorous. When I began to write this post, I marked too many pages I wanted you to see, looked again and chose only a few favorite parts. That's the challenge when reviewing a wonderful book, choosing what to share!


     
              Added to the book filled with poetry and science is a small chickadee guide, the Master of Ceremonies! Let me introduce you.




    Among the amazing facts, the reason for our chickadee guide is that scientists have found "that many other species of birds and some species of other animals living near chickadees can understand chickadee calls--especially warnings about predators in the area." They even lengthen their calls to show that a threat may be large!  Still another intriguing thing about these chickadees is that they can enlarge a part of their brains per a need. The part that needs to remember where those seeds are stored enlarges, or if the memory of a mating call is needed, that part enlarges. Fantastic, right?
          Robert Meganck's chickadee cartoons add to the information with its comments given in speech bubbles. On the page sharing about the wandering albatross, with the widest wingspan of all birds, a bat spreads its wings, too, showing the fact that not only birds have wings. Another page tells about the shrike, with Leslie's poem titled "Ghastly Pantry", a poem showing a way that this bird stores its food. It hangs it on a wire fence or thorny tree to allow it to rot until it softens, until the shrike's small beak can eat!

            Favorite birds, so hard to choose! While I don't know much about many birds, I do know most names, but then I turned the page to hear about the Timberdoodle and to read "Timberdoodle Blues". Here's the beginning:

                                           "Look at me. I've got eyes set above my brain,
                                            Not behind, on the sides–but 'above' my brain.
                                            Looks wierd, but I see three-sixty and can't complain."

It can see 360 degrees without moving its head!


This time, Bulion focuses on the looks, but the poems can show unique traits or behavior examples. Here is one wonderful double-page spread so you can learn about one more bird, enjoy Leslie's unique poems,  as well as Robert's gorgeous digital illustrations.



         The poems are delightful to read aloud, sometimes with rhythm and rhyme, sometimes free-verse, and for a few, forms unique to the bird's geographical area, like the tendi, "a four-line stanza with Arabic origins used in traditional Swahili poetry." for "A Billion Queleas".
         






















           There is something special in every part of the book. The above spread is a picture of the opening inside cover, showing the birds inside with their unique description. The back two covers name the bird!

          Added in the back matter are a glossary, Poetry Notes about each poem, and additional resources to learn more about the world of birds. Bird lovers everywhere need to add this "superlative" book to their collections!


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