Thursday, July 20, 2017

Poetry Friday - "Nothing-to-Do"

Katie hosts today at her blog, The Logonauts! Thanks, Katie! 

         I've been at the ocean's edge for nearly two weeks now. The last part of my family has left to go home, and I have one more day to savor. Today I've walked it, driven past it, watched others dive in, and swum myself, looking for signs of the dolphins, manatees and manta rays that we've seen before. I did see the wonderfully different bunnies again, and crabs were out in the evening. 
         I've watched my grandchildren and children play and laugh and be, here in the magic of nothing-to-do but follow John Masefield's Sea Fever: "I must down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky." 
The grandchildren say goodbye to their own final sunsets.

   Nothing To Do

My dreams tangle
with the reality.
The ocean flashes, splashes,
dashes in to smooth the sand,  
backing out to allow a shell shock
of quick gathering.
The body arrives,
knots untied
from the joy of immersion.
Linda Baie ©All Rights Reserved

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Poetry Friday - Sensational Swap!

          Carol Varsalona, poetry collector extraordinaire, and new grandmother serves as our first July host of Poetry Friday today. She blogs at Beyond Literacy Link. You're welcome to visit for lots of poetry wonders, including the announcement of Carol's most recent collection, the Springsations Gallery about to be shared! Thanks, Carol!

As posted recently: One of the delights several times a year is the Poetry Swap created by Tabatha Yeatts, at The Opposite of Indifference. See the sidebar for the beautiful image she created for us swappers!

This week, I am grateful for another gift of "happy mail", as Keri Collins Lewis called it when I emailed my thanks. I appreciate the collage created on the notecard face, love those 'happy' message cards, and adore the poem. 





        I'm off Saturday to the beach for a couple of weeks, carrying this poem along, steering toward adventure, just as Keri wrote! And looking for clamshell clouds as Brenda wrote in the poem I shared last week! Thanks to both, anticipation is high!
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    A special, and yummy, announcement from Tabatha Yeatts who is our host next Friday at The Opposite of IndifferenceJuly 14th is National Macaroni and Cheese Day. The Poetry Friday Roundup will be in honor of the event and for those who wish, please share for an optional Mac-N-Cheese theme!

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Non-Fiction - People to Know


  Visit Alyson Beecher on Wednesdays for Non-Fiction Picture Books at Kidlit Frenzy.  From Alyson and others, you will discover terrific non-fiction books!

       I realize that there are many things that I do not know, and am grateful for non-fiction picture books that add to my knowledge of the world and its history. Here are two books that tell the stories of two people who in different ways, amazed the world.

"Queen of Computer Code" she became, and "problem solver" she always was. Starting on the inside cover with a poem about Grace, "Software tester. Workplace jester./Order seeker. Well-known speaker." and on into her fun as a young child taking things apart to figure out how they work. Through high school, then on to Vassar and Yale, Grace took on the math and science classes, reveling in her continuing learning. She began teaching, but when World War I started, she realized she could be of greater service there, and finally, they let her join. There are numerous computer discoveries attributed to Grace Hopper, among others the idea that repetitive code could be saved in the computer and used when needed. Really, she was the first to realize this! Her retirement was mandatory until the Navy realized they needed her, so she returned, until 80 years old! It's a story with different inspiring quotes placed on some of the pages. There is plenty of back matter support including a source list, a piece about the honors Grace received, and a wonderful list of books about other women in Stem.  You may remember Laurie Wallmark from another recent book, Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine. Katy Wu's illustrations are toon-like, interacting with the content in different ways. They're colorful and fun.
"

        In 1325 at twenty-one, Ibn Battuta set off on a journey from Tangier, Morocco to Mecca. He didn't return home until nearly thirty years later, visited throughout the Islamic World and beyond. He kept journals, eventually turned into a book, from which Fatima Sharafeddine wrote this story. Fatima's story of Ibn is told in first person, offering an overview of all the places visited and some of the experiences there. Intelaq Mohammed Ali interlaces the text with maps for her illustrations, showing small parts of where some cities, rivers, and oceans are. If studying the middle east, this would work well as a departure for the topic. There are many, many ideas/places discussed by Ibn about his travels.

       Happy Reading!

Sunday, July 2, 2017

Monday Reading - Many Wonders



              Visit Jen at Teach MentorTexts and Kellee and Ricki at UnleashingReaders to discover books you'll love!                                      
                      tweet #IMWAYR

      I'm trying to catch up with my library books, but will only share a few favorites today. I'm taking a couple of weeks off, will be off to the beach for that time starting next Saturday. I imagine we'll all be reading there, am planning to read some adult books, too! I've started Everyone Brave Is Forgiven by Chris Cleave, and before I go, I hope to finish Nikki Grimes' One Last Word. 

       #MustReadin2017: finished Zusak's I Am The Messenger, number 12 of 26!

         I've heard of "Deadbeat Dads", but this book is about a 'Deadbeat Teen', nineteen-year-old Ed Kennedy, an underage cabbie with a few seemingly good friends, Marv, Ritchie and Audrey and an old smelly dog. His mother hates him, there's bitterness in his voice, but he moves along day by day, just the same, knowing his siblings are loved because they're doing well. They have educations and good jobs! It feels like life will stay the same, and Ed's friends seem settled into that kind of life also. There is suspect camaraderie, and a bit of a glaze in their lives until Ed gains some notoriety because he catches a bank robber. That robber told him that every time Ed looked into a mirror, he'd see a dead man. Ed is scared, but deadbeat that he is, he soon forgets the threat, until he gets the first card, an Ace of Diamonds, until he becomes the messenger. There are holding-your-breath scenes, sweet scenes that make you smile, and scenes cruel to believe they might be real. I'm only sorry I took so long to read this book.
for young children, early readers perhaps

            Feelings depend on perspective, and Little Hippo felt “little” all the time, compared to his siblings, his mom and dad, the big old crocodile and the tall, tall giraffe.  However, things can change when Little Hippo helps turn over a small beetle trapped on its back. This simple and beautiful story with soft black-outlined-colored illustrations all by Valeri Gorbachev will please young children as it moves from unhappy to happy, all because of a good deed. 

Saturday, July 1, 2017

Some Baskets Full - Not All

Celebrating with Ruth Ayres at Discover, Play, Build, and linking with others who share, too. I'm always grateful to Ruth for our weekly celebrations together.


       I haven't shared for a couple of weeks. My life is good, all things filling my days are good, and a week from today I'll be at the beach! A favorite thing to celebrate there, and all the rest of the year. I wish everyone a good holiday this Independence Day, one in which to celebrate our wonderful country.
       Here are some pictures that show some of what's been going on, library book sale finds, fun with the grand-girls, flowers, of course, my favorite "gargoyle" at the airport and sky!