Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Non-Fiction Books - Savoring

      Each Wednesday I'm happy to link to Alyson Beecher's Non-Fiction Picture Book Challenge at her blog, Kidlit Frenzy, but I haven't posted for several weeks. That doesn't mean I've read many. It's the ending time of school (I know you know.) and I am scrambling to finish the evaluations.  I love finding good non-fiction picture books available about varied topics, for all ages, too. I own quite a few books, but I also have an amazing library that nearly always has the books I request. Here are three books with stories and illustrations that just might become favorites. I found the titles from the blogs I read, so to some of you, these will not be new. For others, hope you'll find them.
        Thanks Alyson!

Steve Jenkins and Robin Page have written another beautiful book that teaches. In egg, I learned many things about eggs, and especially loved that the information showed size in relationship to something familiar, and sometimes real sizes! The book is divided as you might guess, who lays them, where, how are they protected, and what happens at birth? There is a little additional information in the back matter. For those studying eggs, or the intricacies of animal behavior, this is a wonderful book. It is limited in information. Sometimes I had more questions. But that's good. It's a great book to start a child's interest in more than eggs. The animals fascinate too! The illustrations are marvelous Jenkins collages.




       I've seen this emu book by Claire Saxby reviewed and loved more than once, and the reviewers are right; it is wonderful. Just look at that face! The unique qualities of emus is that they only live in Australia, the male is the one who stays until the eggs hatch (like that sweet father penguin), and they lay eggs with shadowy stripes for camouflage in the grasses. The text is designed so that the "story" is told in one font, and the background facts are in another. I love the page (all the illustrations are full page spreads  by Graham Byrne and gorgeous) where the about-to-hatch chick cheeps. The explanation says it's to help wake up the others so they can all emerge within a few days of each other. One cannot help look and look at the pictures and enjoy the story of these big birds. The book is newly released from Australia.


This is another book I can't wait to read to my granddaughters. Since we read so many books, I think they will adore it, and love looking at all the happy detail of children learning how to read a story, with Mark Siegel's thought clouds floating all around the page. Books are spread on the floor as the little boy looks for just the right book. Kate Messner's definite directions are exactly right: "Couches are cozy. So are chairs big enough for two. Just be careful not to get stuck." There are more directions and a lovely surprise at the end. 

21 comments:

  1. Three new books to check out! Thank you!

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  2. Two faves here: Emu and How To Read a Story! Plus, Steve Jenkins, win, win, win.
    :->

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    1. Yep-all good, Teresa. Glad to hear you liked them, too!

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  3. Two titles we must have and do not know! How to Read a Story looks like a great text for procedural text study and Emu book had us at the cover. Thanks for these -- enjoy some time to read, breathe and pause.
    Clare and Tammy

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    1. Terrific, both are really wonderful. That cover is spectacular, I agree.

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  4. So pleased you also love Emu! I have this latest book by Jenkins but haven't yet read it. Can't wait!

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    1. Too many in the stacks, right? I thought Emu was just delightful, Carrie.

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  5. I think every teacher would want to start their year with Kate Messner's book! Seems so simple, but brilliant!
    I loved Egg. I think that's one of the best things about the early reader books Page and Jenkins have put out, it there is just enough information for those young readers. It's not overwhelming like many nonfiction books are, for those little guys. We used this book with kindergarten this year and it was perfect for their study!

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    1. How To Read A Story was delightful, agreed, Michele. And you're right, Egg is just right for the little ones, just enough information to start an interest or answer a few questions. Thanks!

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  6. The Kate Messner book would pair with Rosemary Well's Read to Your Bunny. I really need to read Emu.

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    1. I'll have to find the Wells book, Earl. I don't know it, but I love her books. Thanks for the idea.

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  7. That face is what caught me. What a fantastic expression on that emu!

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    1. Isn't it wonderful? I think it would have grabbed me fast in a book store.

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  8. These all sound wonderful, and one I hadn't even heard of before. Thanks, Linda!

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    1. You're welcome, Laura-all beautifully done!

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  9. All new titles for me! Thanks for sharing. There will be good books on my hold shelf soon. See you next week at All Write! You need to bring a picture of your home library and hallway. :)

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    1. I need you to come help, Ramona! I will take a pic, promise. Glad you share new books with you, of course. Can't wait to see you!

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    2. Swallowtail

      Poem By Jessica Bigi

      Powered stars
      Suns brilliant light
      When rain pours
      She collects
      Pools of diamonds
      On her wings
      Every predator
      Thinks that
      she a flower
      Her teardrop wings
      swallow blue sky
      Waving goodbey
      to a day’s work done

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    3. Thank you, Jessica. This is lovely.

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  10. Emu looks like so much fun! Such mischief in the book cover. Egg also looks promising. Unfortunately we don't have How To Read A Book in our public library yet.
    :(

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