Tuesday, March 7, 2017

SOLC17 Day 8/31 Plus NF Picture Books

SOLC #6/31 - 
      I'm slicing with the Two Writing Teachers community for Day Eight of Thirty-One of the Slice of Life Challenge in March.  Thank you, Stacey, Beth, Deb, Betsy, Lanny, Kathleen, Lisa, and Melanie.  


              And, Thanks to Alyson Beecher's Non-Fiction Picture Book Challenge at Kidlit Frenzy. Each Wednesday a group of us share non-fiction picture books we believe everyone should know about. The books inspire and teach, and help students if you're a teacher of writing see how others share non-fiction research. 
          It's an older book filled with information and pictures of happy people checking out books! Not everyone in the US has immediate access to books, but many of us do, and all of us should. In the past, my family owned a cabin in the mountains and in a small town on the way there, there is a tiny library with only a part-time librarian, run the rest of the time by volunteers. They continually have a book sale going, too, and we often stopped to see what was available, sometimes dropped off a donation. I've been very impressed that this town created a library for their community.
         Until seventh grade, I lived in a small town with no library. I remember my excitement when the bookmobile came to town. I was an avid reader, just like now, and checked out so many books, was appreciative of the bookmobile librarian who also drove the vehicle. I did own a lot of books, but finding new ones, having that smart librarian say things like "Have you read this author?" and "I brought this just for you." was a thrill.



          In this book, My Librarian Is A Camel. thirteen countries' "bookmobiles" are shared, including pictures, brief text about the way the check out for each one works, and additional information about the countries and the unique geography that demands a different dispersal of books. One also delivers mail! For example, In Papua, New Guinea, a non-profit organization is dedicated to bringing books to a remote area in that country. Books are brought in a truck up a winding mountain road and then many are carried on volunteers' backs for a four-hour hike further up the mountain. And, on one of England's beaches, a librarian carried a wheelbarrow of books to beach tourists for check-out as they vacation. I was amazed and inspired by the dedication of these librarians. 

       I also researched to find others that I've read in recent years about librarians who bring books whatever way is available or required. Here are a few of those I found. I'm sure there are others. Please share your titles in the comments.


       I moved to my new home a bit over four years ago, and one of the enticements was that the local library is just a block up the street. It's a wonderful library, and the larger system has nearly every book I ever request. Then, like most of you I guess, I just have those books requested sent to my library. Love it!

       If you have fond memories of things like bookmobiles, don't forget to share!






Here's a second book about this book-carrying burro, thanks to Annette Pimental. Thanks, Annette!

40 comments:

  1. Fascinating library insights Linda. Only today I made mention of a library on a bicycle that I saw on a trip to Bali a few years ago. The inventiveness of people who make books accessible is infinite. Thanks for reminding us of this important information.

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    1. You're welcome, Alan. The book does have a part in it about bicycle delivery, too! As I wrote, it's wonderful to see those so dedicated to bring books to people, especially children.

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  2. Books on the move ... bringing stories to places where stories are needed the most ... is there anything more worthwhile in the world? If only those in power would find more ways to shift priorities ...
    Kevin

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    1. And a wonderful world it would be, Kevin!

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  3. Love the idea of a bookmobile text set. There's another one that I'll think of later today, and I bet others will add to it. So many times, libraries saved kids. I wonder if they will know that there's so much technology in the world.

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    1. I too remember another one, but couldn't find it, Melanie. This book is old enough that if a new one was created, there might be a section for e-books. In the most remote areas, though, I'm not sure.

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  4. Some of my earliest book memories involve riding my bike to see Mrs. Holly at the bookmobile parked at a shopping center not too far from my house. I love, love, love this text set. I have all of these, except MISS DOROTHY, which of course, I will need to run out and find immediately!

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    1. I know that the bookmobile ran in the city, too, but perhaps branch libraries have taken its place. Love hearing your memory, Carol.

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  5. A bookmobile?!?! Awesome! I've always wanted to live somewhere with a bookmobile.

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    1. I found some information about them on the ALA site, but it was not recent data, Michelle. Perhaps they're now only in remote areas?

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  6. I love this post! I received a copy of That Book Woman as a graduation gift for my library science degree. I enjoy pulling all of our library-related books out in April for National Library Month. I don't remember being on a bookmobile route when I was younger--we always had access to a library, either stateside or at military bases abroad. I did get to go on a field trip to an oceanic ship that was made over into a bookstore, though, as it docked in the bay of Naples!

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    1. The Book Woman is a beautiful gift idea, Chris. How awesome to hear about that ship! I researched it, & it's now being turned into a luxury hotel! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_Doulos_Phos Thanks for telling me!

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  7. What a wonderful collection of books on the move, Linda! We have a bookmobile in upstate NY for the areas around the farm, and I want to get involved with this work.

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    1. That's great to hear, Tara. Wouldn't it be fun to be a part of it? I imagine if we researched more, there would be marvelous tales to tell!

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  8. We had a bookmobile that came out to Lutes Mountain when I was a little girl! It was so exciting!

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    1. Love hearing about the memory, Loralee. I guessed that if I wrote about this, others would have an experience, too. Thanks!

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  9. Biblioburro: A True Story from Colombia (by Jeanette Winter) is a second title about the book-bearing donkey.

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    1. You're right! I have forgotten about that one. Thanks, Annette!

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  10. As a former school librarian, Kathy would love these book. I will share them with her.

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    1. Terrific, Bob. It was so interesting to see how people ensured that people got books!

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  11. All favorite books. Some years a go I did post in praise of librarians and libraries. Your post made me remember that. During the summer as a child, we would wait for the book mobile to arrive. It brought such joy.

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    1. There are some personal stories from many who have good memories of the libraries that saved them. Glad to hear of your post, and your wait for the bookmobile too, Mary Ann!

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  12. New Deal WPA art blog post included photo of rural librarians delivering books on horseback.

    "Stream in [Franklin] County, Kentucky - main trail for horseback librarians. A few miles beyond this point, the librarians part, taking four trails into the mountains." During the New Deal, work-relief programs like the Federal Emergency Relief Administration and the WPA hired unemployed librarians to deliver books and magazines to remote rural areas. Photo (ca. 1933-1935) courtesy of the National Archives.

    http://nddaily.blogspot.com/2016/10/new-deal-book-projects.html

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  13. We've read a lot about Biblioburro, but this one is a new story for me!

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    1. Good, enjoy the story. Perhaps it will add to what you already know, Michele.

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  14. Libraries are the savior for many. It is so wonderful how people can get books around the world. We don't appreciate our ease to get a book.

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    1. I agree, Elsie, many of us who do have easy access don't realize how valuable it is. Thanks!

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  15. More amazing books found by you!! Thank you, Linda. I never had the experience of a bookmobile...but I remember loving libraries since I was a very young girl. I remember the day when I "outgrew" the children's book section and was allowed to look at adult books - so amazing!!

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    1. I almost wrote about those "permissions", Maureen I didn't like it that I was not allowed into the adult section. I got my mother to check out some books for me! It was always exciting to get to go to the library. Thanks!

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  16. Wow! I love this collection of books about book delivery systems. I recently wrote a poem about the Little Free Library. Have those popped up in your area? We had the bookmobile come to our school 30 years ago when I first started teaching. It's no longer in service, but the kids got so excited about it.

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    1. Yes, we have those little free libraries everywhere. I'd love to have one, but so far I'm just too busy. Fun to hear about your bookmobile! Thanks, Margaret.

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  17. What great book suggestions! I love Bibblioburro and can NOT wait to introduce your other related books. I also know the power of a public library. I recently moved and can WALK to MY library where I will CERTAINLY volunteer when I retire!

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    1. My back door neighbor is one of the librarians at my library & she keeps wanting me to volunteer, but I guess I'll stay with the bookstore. It would be fun though. Glad you liked the books, Anita! Thanks!

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  18. I love this! Maybe in my next life, I'm a librarian...this post has inspired some of that thinking! Thanks!

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    1. When I was going to school, I didn't know there were going to be school librarians except in high school, or I'm sure I would have become one, Kendra. We didn't even have libraries in my early schools. Wishing for you!

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  19. I love books about libraries. If you come across any new new titles, let me know!

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    1. I will Earl. Maybe it's time to make a page for them? Thanks!

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  20. We have a beautiful little library in my town right next door to the elementary school. When I was a kid, we'd walk there every week. So many happy memories! Dorothy and Her Bookmobile is new to me. I'll check to see if we have it at school tomorrow.

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    1. Hope you find it, and I love hearing about your library. In our other home where my kids grew up, one of the best things was we had a neighborhood library too and could walk there. I'm lucky to have another so close. Thanks, Catherine.

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Having a conversation is a good thing!