Thursday, June 13, 2013

A Workshop Takeaway

 Thanks to Margaret at Reflections on the Teche for hosting Poetry Friday.  Read her wonderful post about writing camp and the ekphrastic poetry written during writing marathon.  Then check out all the other posts linking up!


          A quote from my experience Thursday:  Language is the essential condition of knowing, the process by which experience becomes knowledge.         Michael Halliday

        In a workshop Thursday, A colleague and I enjoyed listening to Peter Johnston, educator and author of Choice Words. Through examining his recent book, Opening Minds, he created a day of conversation about words, the way we use them as we speak with students/family/friends.  It was an educator’s day, yet also one of conversation about good ways to live one’s life.    Some of Peter’s philosophy reminded me of that of Haim Ginott, a psychologist of years ago whose books and influences live on.      

      
       A full description of this day is left better for an education post, but I did take away one wonderful thing for Poetry Friday, which I hope you will enjoy.  One of the participants wondered how we can take the time to include what Peter called “social imagination”, a way to extend the connections between ourselves and things we encounter, in groups and through reading and other activities.  His answer: How can we not?  And he shared the following poem by the poet laureate of New York, Marie Howe.

Its title is Hurry

and begins:

     We stop at the dry cleaners and the grocery store   
     and the gas station and the green market and   
     Hurry up honey, I say, hurry,   
 
                   Find the rest here!

18 comments:

  1. Dear Linda, Oh, I love this poem! I shared it with teachers this very week...and also Paul Janeczko's "How to Hug Your Three-Year-Old-Daughter". Such poems are reminders to me. I must now find OPENING MINDS in these piles and open it up. Thank you for your always gracious and thoughtful words today. a.

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    1. Serendipity, Amy! What a wonderful poem to share with those teachers this week that's so special to you. I loved hearing it!

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  2. Yes, I've seen this one before and it is a startling reminder of how most of us live our lives and how we must rethink the concept of time and re-prioritize. The rushed child is a stressed child.

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    1. Thanks Jama. So right to slow down as often as possible!

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  3. Good reminder! I love that poem.

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    1. So many of you know it! I was so happy to discover it! Thanks, Ruth!

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  4. This made me think of that song Cat's in the Cradle. We teach so many things by example, don't we? Sometimes without realizing it. Hopefully we pass along some good things, too.

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    1. I believe it is good to slow down, but children are resilient too, & enjoy whatever they get to do with their parents. Thanks, Doraine!

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  5. Ooh, what a neat poem, Linda! I'm jealous that you got to hear Peter Johnson. I've been working my way slowly through Opening Minds this year (I really have no good reason it's taken so long except that I don't often feel like reading "teaching books" during the school year...) and I've really enjoyed it!

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    1. I have only read a little bit, but now am even more interested. I loved Choice Words & feel it's so important. Thanks Jennifer!

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  6. "Hurry!" How many times have I said this to my two girls? Too many! Marie Howe's poem captures that hustle-bustle time with little ones. Thanks for sharing. =)

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    1. I'm sure we've all done it more than once, Bridget. Thanks for 'taking in' the message!

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  7. "Social imagination" ... I like it! I have needed to watch my behavior today, because today has been distressing and I am stressed. Those are the hardest times to temper our tongue.

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    1. I know, I learned to bite my lips many a time! The 'social imagination' means to be able to imagine oneself in relationships, making connections, in one's life, or in books/writing/future. Takes lots of conversations & thinking, s.l.o.w time! Thanks, Tabatha!

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  8. LOVE Peter Johnston! LOVE this poem!! Good reminder that children learn by our example!

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    1. Yes! It was a good day to contemplate what we do and say. Thanks, Mary Lee!

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  9. I truly love this poem. thanks for sharing!

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Having a conversation is a good thing!