Monday, February 2, 2015

Patience Is A Virtue


            Thanks to Stacey, Tara, Dana, Beth, Anna and Betsy and all this blogging community for the Tuesday Slice of Life!  




How can a society that exists on instant mashed potatoes, packaged cake mixes, frozen dinners, and instant cameras teach patience to its young?  ~Paul Sweeney

I watched the Super Bowl Sunday night, and we’re starting the week before the big week, our show-what-you’ve-learned-from-your-unit-so-far this year EXPO, and I made a few connections.

I admired both teams. They showed qualities of teamwork and persistence in the face of  mistakes. In addition, both fought hard to catch up with the other team when they were behind. Yet, there at the end, when Seattle amazed by marching down the field, nearly winning in the final seconds, there was a feeling of hurry. 



As an armchair observer, and I really don’t watch much, it seemed the lack of patience lost the game. If only, if only the Seattle quarterback had thought another few seconds about the plan. The announcers called him young, the youngest and best QB in the NFL, and I wonder if patience through experience won out this time? 

I really watched and thought about the times that certain students take time, stand back, look at what’s been accomplished, assess it, ask for advice (from classmates as well as me). Others don’t take the time to find a ruler or yardstick to measure, don’t make marks carefully when stenciling, and spend more time erasing than care in coloring.  It seems like the value of patience is needed, patience that the work can be done well without hurry, and patience from the teacher that all will work out, even if the student chooses to do things in a different way.

It takes a lot of slow to grow.

Measure twice, cut once.

A stitch in time saves nine.

Loose lips sink ships (and relationships). I know there is another 'primary' meaning to this, but it seems to fit here too.

          I know you’re laughing at that final one, but the teacher needs to be as patient as the student, yikes!  Remember to stand back once in a while, look and listen, and allow the students to “do” their own thing. Perhaps that Seattle coach hurried the QB, and they both lost.


photo credit: Jeppe Toustrup via photopin cc

28 comments:

  1. Such a great reminder. As we continue to "look at the data" I am having to remind myself to let the children "do" their thing. (Read and Write and Problem Solve authentically) I wonder if the Seattle Coach felt like he had to hurry his QB? I'll think about this all day. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. I guess we'll never know, & perhaps he won't either, Kendra. But being patient seems to reap good rewards. Thanks!

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  2. A great reminder to take it slow. Enjoyed your post!

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  3. "Stand back, and allow students to DO!" Great advice. I think I need to make a sign for myself that reminds me of this on a regular basis. Pass on the responsibility. Observe more. Thank you Linda!

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    1. It's not an easy thing to do, but seems critical for learning. Thanks, Jaana.

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  4. Patience. Such an important reminder.

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  5. A great connection Linda. Our world can seem to just knock the patience out of us at times. Thank you for reminding me of this. We need to be mindful of this for our students and ourselves. It could be seen as a gift. Giving patience is a kindness we need to extend!

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  6. Slow is really not a part of the world today is it? We have to find it, and make it present. A former colleague of mine, (now retired) used to tell her first graders all the time, "It's a journey, not a race."

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  7. Patience is as virtue that it seems more and more are lacking in this instant gratification society in which we live. What a shame!

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  8. Patience truly is a virtue. Enjoyed your post, Linda.

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  9. SuperBowl in Cancun happened even if we could care less. But it was fun to watch the half-time show.
    I love the way you find a way to connect this Super Bowl to learning. I'm thinking... :)

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  10. Very interesting take on the "game" Linda. I just read an article on Jillian Michaels and this is exactly what she was saying....ahhh patience!

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  11. Ah, patience...such a difficult virtue! ;-) You're so right about that final play. What a mistake!! I struggle with patience as a teacher. I always seem to be hurrying my students. There is so much to be done in so little time!! I hate that. On days that I slow down and am patient, I tend to be so much happier - my students too! Thank you for such an insightful post!

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  12. Ah, those are some wise words Linda! It's so hard to remember to be patient sometimes but it's always worth the wait. I always feel that pull to hurry - both at home, at school, with my children, with myself - but it's so much better to slow down! It takes a lot of slow to grow...one of my favorites!

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  13. I love this. I often say Patience is a virtue I have a hard time cultivating. It is such a necessary one though. Thank you for sharing and giving me food for thought.

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  14. I did not watch the game, but I get it. We all need that kind of patience. The patience that keeps us calm and focused. Thanks for this interesting perspective of the game.

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  15. It takes a lot of slow to grow.
    I think we've lost this idea completely - everyone expect everything instantly. An, our kids and society suffers for this impatience.
    I will have to say, though, that I'm glad the young man was hurried in this instance, for it allowed my Patriots to win. I was patiently hoping for that :)

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  16. It takes a lot of slow to grow.
    I think we've lost this idea completely - everyone expect everything instantly. An, our kids and society suffers for this impatience.
    I will have to say, though, that I'm glad the young man was hurried in this instance, for it allowed my Patriots to win. I was patiently hoping for that :)

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  17. I watched too...I wanted the Seahawks...I about died when it was intercepted...husband thought it was a coaching error...that they didn't run it. I wonder? I love the 'slow to grow' quote. Great comparison piece! xo

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  18. Your post is a nice match up for Tara Smith's post today. She also discusses the value of just watching. I need to do more of this. (Watching my students that is...not more football! :)) Have a great rest of your week, Linda!

    Jennifer

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  19. "It takes a lot of slow to grow" is such an important thing to remember! I like how you thought about yardsticks and showing learners how far they have come. :-)

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  20. Everyone, thanks for all your responses, fun to see that all are agreed, except Tara for the game, which I understand perfectly, Tara. It was a shocker though! I do think I need this post especially during this time, keep that mantra, watch, wait, listen, don't jump in! This is not easy, but so far, a good thing!

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  21. This is such a smart post, Linda. Sometimes I think slowing down is the only way we can make progress in the long run!

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  22. That was a REALLY interesting observation! It's interesting b/c my husband sat there being that armchair coach, but I'm pretty sure he didn't heed any of that advice either!!

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  23. I love these ideas, I think they work perfectly well with young learners. I am actually thinking of using some of them while teaching my own kids. I will let you know how it works with them. Thanks for sharing.

    kids schools

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  24. I loved that Sweeney quote and these:

    It takes a lot of slow to grow.

    Measure twice, cut once.

    A stitch in time saves nine.

    It sure is hard to teach kids to be patient AND to be patient with ourselves and those around us. Thanks for the reminder.

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  25. Hi, Linda. I needed this advice today as I complete book revisions. It feels like slow-going sometimes. Patience and persistence win the day.

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Having a conversation is a good thing!