Thursday, September 3, 2015

Poetry Friday Welcome

Welcome to Poetry Friday, take a moment to enjoy the beauty that is shared.

When the seasons shift, even the subtle beginning, the scent of a promised change, I feel something stir inside me. Hopefulness? Gratitude? Openness? Whatever it is, it's welcome.
                                                                                                   Kristin Armstrong



         Is it okay with you if I speak of autumn, here before Labor Day? I hope so, because I want to highlight a recent book by Barbara Crooker that I've been reading, and then reading again. Her poems  make me pause, and work harder when I write. Her words please me and I hope will please you, too. In an interview here, Barbara says that when putting a book together, "first I write the poems.  Then I see which of them are book-worthy, and then I look for themes.  Then I try to find a title that best describes what’s going on in the book.  I think arrangement is important, and I spend a lot of time on this.  Robert Frost said if there are 26 poems in a book, then the 27th poem is the book itself, and that’s what I’m aiming for. . . ."








          Small Rain, out last spring, circles the year from January to December. As I read, I've marked a few lines here and there that will give a flavor of the season, but certainly I hope if you haven't already, that you will find or purchase the book and read it all. 

       from After The Holidays - "The thin tinsel of the new moon/hangs in the dark sky, a comma/dividing the sentence between/ last year's troubles and this year's/ hopes."

       from Suddenly - "the fields on the hills/have shifted into green, full speed ahead,"

       from Zen - "My spine fits this adirondack chair like clay/poured in a mold. I want to be neither here,/nor there. Birds hum me to sleep."

       and for us, now, waiting. . . from Small Stanzas In Autumn

"We tilt at the balancing point, between summer's too much/and winter's not-enough; the sumac flickers red in the hedgerow."

       You can find some of Barbara Crooker's poems and other interviews online here
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65 comments:

  1. Hi Linda! Thank you for hosting! I started reading Small Rain on our trip to Alabama for my father-in-law's funeral. The themes of aging, death, and seasons resonated with me, though I'll say that first poem just knocked my socks off and made me long for December 26! :-) The lines you selected are perfect and hint at the glories inside the book. Hugs!

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    1. Oh, so happy to hear from someone who has read this wonderful book of Barbara Crooker. I enjoy her words so much. Thanks, Keri.

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  2. Hi Linda! Great post today! I need to read more of Ms. Crooker's work.

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    1. Thanks, Diane, I hope you'll find a poem just right for you.

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  3. Thank you so much for hosting! And I don't mind switching to fall already - it's my favorite season.

    I'm in with two found poems composed from Beatles' song titles.

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    1. Thanks, Kelly, happy you are welcoming fall, too.

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  4. Thank you for hosting, Linda. I'm a fan of Barbara's work (we've published her poetry in Little Patuxent Review). Her description of putting a book together is wonderful.

    Today, I'm sharing another poem in my "Leaving Home" series, as my family adjusts to our son heading to college. This time, the poem is a beautiful taste of parenting, travel, and olives from the Wisconsin poet, Lisa Vihos.

    http://authoramok.blogspot.com/2015/09/poetry-friday-leaving-home-part-3.html

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    1. I do love any kind of 'leaving' or 'goodbye' poem, Laura, and look forward to reading your post. Happy to hear of your connection with Barbara Crooker. Thank you.

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  5. Love the Small Rain lines that you shared, Linda. Barbara is one of my favorite contemporary poets. :)

    At Alphabet Soup, I have an interview with Nancy Tupper Ling about her new story-in-verse, Double Happiness. Also giving away a copy to one commenter. My link goes live at 6 a.m. EDT.

    Thanks for hosting this week! Enjoy your holiday weekend.

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    1. Thanks, Jama, glad to hear of another 'fan'. Hope your weekend is a good one, too.

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  6. Thanks for hosting, Linda, and for introducing me to Barbara Crooker!

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    1. Wonderful, I hope you'll enjoy some of her poems, Sylvia.

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  7. Thanks for hosting, Linda! I love the idea of "the scent of a promised change". And I intend to find Crooker's book/poetry soon. =)

    I have a poem to share about an interesting, but unwelcomed backyard visitor:

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    1. Hm-m, you have made me curious, Bridget. We've had coyotes around, but so far not in my backyard! Enjoy the Crooker book when you find it.

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  8. Oh, I love Barbara Crooker too! Her imagery... sigh. I enjoyed learning about her method of putting together a collection too. Thanks for hosting today, Linda. :)

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    1. You're welcome, Michelle, so glad to hear that you love Crooker's poems, too. I liked the interview I posted, and that part about her creation of a book especially.

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  9. Hi Linda, Thanks so much for hosting. The teasers you selected are very intriguing. The thin tinsel of the moon pulls me right in. I'm sharing the process of writing my poem "Looking for a Book: A Dialogue with a Librarian" from The Poetry Friday Anthology for Celebrations.

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    1. Happy you like those beautiful words, Liz, and look forward to your explanation. Thanks.

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  10. I'm going to have to look for that book - it sounds wonderful! Thanks for sharing, Linda. I have been prepping all week for my 65-hour announcing marathon at the local state fair, so I have no post today, nor will I be around much this weekend; however, I am sharing the link to this past Tuesday's post, when I spotlighted
    Laura Purdie Salas' new book, "Catching My Breath," in which I have two poems.

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    1. Wonderful idea to share your poems & Laura's book, too, Matt. I saw on FB that you'll be busy this weekend, creating your own "vocal" poems. Hope it's fun!

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  11. Yes, *please* speak of autumn--my favorite time of year:>) This book sounds lovely, and I esp. like the final lines you shared about fall. Small Rain is also the title of a Madeleine L'Engle novel (http://amzn.to/1QcnM4x), and now I'm feeling like I should reread that and enjoy this book of poems you shared, too!

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    1. Your L'Engle novel is one I don't know, Laura, so will look for it. Thanks for telling me. Glad you like those autumn lines. It is time for this beautiful season.

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  12. Nothing better than poems that make you pause and work harder in your own writing! Thanks for introducing Barbara Crooker, and for hosting.

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    1. You're welcome, Buffy. I do read and examine, wonder! It's lovely to find a poet who does that for me.

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  13. I'm with Kelly and Laura - Fall is my favorite season, so please, speak of it early and late! Thanks for hosting, Linda, and sharing these gems by Barbara Crooker. [And I didn't know that Frost quote she shared about creating a book of poetry - so good!]

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    1. I really don't know much background on many poets, so the Frost was new to me, a delightful one to think about. I'm happy you are ready for fall, too, Robyn. Thanks.

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  14. I'm thinking Autumn, too, Linda - albeit reluctantly. This sounds lovely, I'll have to get a copy of my own.

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    1. It is lovely, Tara. I hope you enjoy it, too. I know after last winter that many of you wonder what will happen this coming one, after fall, so understand the reluctance. Thanks!

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  15. Appreciations for sharing this title & poet new to me, Barbara Crooker. I look forward to exploring the interview (what an interesting last name!) Appreciations also for the shoutout & for all these poetry blog links.

    From her "Zen" the eyedear of birds humming her to sleep especially appeals to me, as I often only think of birds calling me awake in the morn, as today.

    Lovely post to carry me thru a bizee holdiay weekend Linda.

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    1. Happy to hear that I've introduced you to a new poet, Jan. Enjoy all you read, and have a wonderful weekend.

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  16. After a week of temps in the 90s, I'm happy to think about autumn! The snippets of Barbara Crooker's poetry you've shared are lovely. I especially love "birds hum me to sleep." Thank you for hosting today, Linda!

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    1. You're welcome, Catherine, isn't that the most lovely line about summer? Glad to see you here.

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  17. This bit had me re-re-reading: "comma/dividing the sentence between/ last year's troubles and this year's/ hopes." Barbara Crooker uses such striking imagery. Thanks for hosting us this week!

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    1. I'm pleased to host, Tabatha. I love that she brings new thoughts to our same old parts of life, too. Thanks.

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  18. On Poetry Fridays, I often wish I had the day off to just immerse myself in poetry. I discovered Barbara Crooker from someone's blog post. Maybe yours? I don't have this one, though. Her poetry is so accessible and always speaks to me. And like you said, it makes me try harder as a writer.

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    1. I don't remember when I discovered her either, Margaret, but am so glad I did. I hope you find time today to enjoy the poetry, and have a wonderful weekend too.

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  19. Dear Linda, I love the red sumac flickering! Lovely images. Thank you so much for sharing... excited for your working-hard writing life! xo

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    1. Yes! As I take my walks, the signs are there, although I don't know if there is sumac in my neighborhood, I can find it in the foothills. Thanks, Irene.

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  20. Thanks so much for hosting and for the tip toward Barbara Crooker's poetry! Love discovering new work....

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    1. You're welcome, Liz. Enjoy all the beautiful poems.

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  21. Linda, I love Barbara Crooker, and you can talk about autumn anytime -- I love autumn. Just beginning to feel the flickers of seasonal change here in Nebraska, and it's lovely. Thanks for hosting this week!

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    1. I think we have slightly cooler weather coming, Karen, and are glad to have it. Hope you'll find something new from Barbara in the links.

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  22. Linda,
    Thank you for sharing a "new to me" poet. I can't wait to read more.

    I'm in today with my poetry sisters sharing some found poems.
    Thanks for hosting!
    Best,
    Tricia

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    1. I always love reading what you and the sisters are doing, Tricia. Glad to introduce you to Barbara Crooker, too.

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  23. Linda,

    Thank you for hosting and thank you for sharing the beautiful lines from Small Rain. Reading them added joy to my morning.

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    1. You're welcome Penny. Have a fabulous day and holiday weekend.

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  24. SMALL RAIN sounds beautiful, Linda. I really like the lines you shared--thank you! Thanks for hosting PF this week, too!

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    1. You're welcome, Becky. I hope you find the book and enjoy it as I have.

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  25. My selection is "Birds of a Feather" by Jane Yolen with illustrations by Jason Stemple.

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  26. I love the idea of a "balancing point" between too much and not enough. Also, I'm tucking away that "27th poem" quote.

    I'm in today with my Poetry Sisters and found poetry (I've re-dubbed us the Salvage Sisters this month!) http://saralewisholmes.blogspot.com/2015/09/poetry-friday-wiseguy-found-poem.html

    Thank you so much for hosting.

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    1. Thanks, Sara, love that term "Salvage Sisters", at least for the month.

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  27. Many Faces

    Hard at work

    Finding welcoming

    Everyday life

    Better daring

    New Newer

    artists

    A calling

    For Every Season

    Opening one Sky

    What I Know

    The light at

    the end of tunnel

    Changing The World

    We are Artiest

    found Poem By Jessica Bigi


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  28. Linda, my library doesn't have this book. I knew her name sounded familiar so I meandered through my favorite poems file and found two other poems by her that I've enjoyed. Meandering is dangerous and keeps me from my more important work of purging, but it's also more enjoyable. Saving my poems to share on a future Poetry Friday. "...The sumac flickers red..." a gorgeous image!

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    1. Ah, wonderful that you found some others, Ramona. The book is recent, hope you can request that your library purchase it, too. Purge a lot, save a little, or is it the other way 'round? Have a wonderful weekend.

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  29. Linda, I agree with Margaret that Poetry Fridays need a day long of reflection to savor everyone's work. Thank you for showcasing a new poet to me and reminding us that autumn is approaching. My wheels are already turning.

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  30. I was so immersed in trying to design Summer Splashings that I totally forgot to link-up my post here at your blog until now.

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    1. You're welcome, Carol, glad you now have a new poet to search for. I still don't see your link appearing, FYI.

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  31. My two favourite bites were the Robert Frost quote, and the exquisite snippets from After the Holidays. It also took me back to a post I hosted with Australian poet Lorraine Marwood, earlier in the year, reflecting on Australia's Autumn. (https://katswhiskers.wordpress.com/2015/03/03/celebrating-australia-with-lorraine-marwood)

    Thanks for hosting, Linda. Lovely to meet you and your words. :) My PoetryFriday post is a quick-grab how-to write a solage. Just for fun!

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    1. Thanks for your post, and for the extra link! Glad you joined in!

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  32. I just took a picture of a sumac by the end of our driveway that had one red leaf. Fall is headed our way.
    This book seems to be another one I may need in my collection. What a beautiful phrasing: "a comma/dividing the sentence between/ last year's troubles and this year's/ hopes"!

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    1. Terrific to hear, Donna. I missed you on Poetry Friday! The book is lovely, as are earlier ones by her too.

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  33. I came back upon this blog post and realized that a whole other dimension of sensory poetry is being offered with Barbara Crooker's poetry. Thanks.

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    1. I have a new one by Crooker that I haven't opened yet. Maybe I need to take my words more seriously? Thanks, Carol!

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