Thursday, November 19, 2015

Poetry Friday - Divided

Tricia Stohr-Hunt at The Miss Rumphius Effect hosts Poetry Friday todayThanks, Tricia!




        I am saddened by the events in Paris. I am both saddened and alarmed by the response from the United States this week. 
        I found a quote that touches some current politics. Do you know it? I did not. “The people can always be brought to the bidding of their leaders. All you have to do is tell them that they are in danger of being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger.” Hermann Goering  
         So I've wondered all week, what can I do to make it different?  I'm reading more than usual of other points of view, more history, the background of leaders. I want to understand. And then it snowed. How does that connect? Trying to find a metaphor for differences, I sat listening, sometimes watching the snowstorm, and wrote the poem below, my feelings of what makes the world both wonderful and frightening, that windowsill.
Click to enlarge.


37 comments:

  1. That poem is really lovely, Linda. I wonder, too, about the "window sill" that divides worlds - fire/snow, warmth/chill. I wonder about the news I get - can I trust it? I wonder about my privileged life - I mean, I had to get out an atlas to find certain countries last week, I had to make sure I really knew where they were. Gad! Meanwhile, a fire burns in my wood stove and I'm planning Thanksgiving dinner with a dozen family members, all of whom I love to distraction. We're all safe. we're all happy and warm. I wonder about the right way to share that, how to hand something across "the window sill." Thanks again for the poem. I'm going to memorize it and say it to myself as I fall asleep tonight.

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    1. Thanks, Julie, you echo my thoughts. Embracing our friends and family is still good, but doing more to help is also something good. Happy Thanksgiving.

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  2. Masterful! God bless you. Thank you!

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    1. You're welcome. I'm glad you came by to read.

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  3. Your best yet! Lots to ponder here.

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    1. Thanks, Donna. Indeed there is so much happening in our world.

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  4. Warmth and light/dark and chill. Even though your poem evokes a fireside winter scene, I see the connection to Paris's vibrant streets chilled by violence.

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  5. Love your poem, Linda. It is hard to know how to help. So many people need helping!

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    1. At this time of year when we are celebrating much, it's not easy to see those without. Thanks, Tabatha.

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  6. Masterful poem, so eloquent, Linda. We all share the extreme sadness and feelings of hopelessness, wanting to better understand and find ways to help. It's beyond comprehension, isn't it?

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    1. Last weekend, it was hard to watch, but watch I did, and now the response from the US this week is hard, too. I hope that some feeling people step up to do the right thing. Thanks, Jama.

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  7. Linda, that is a beautiful poem! I love your metaphor for our divided world. So sad...

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    1. Thanks, Iza. I appreciate the response.

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  8. Wonderful contrasts, Linda! Thank you!

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    1. You're welcome, JoAnn, something I needed to write.

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  9. this is a very powerful poem the coldness of our world shows in it the divisions that people put between each other and it is sad and scary to think in these storms in life unlike snow our one windows aren't t safe to us anymore

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  10. This is a wonderful poem, Linda! Love the windowsill metaphor. Important to remember especially in times like these all we have to be grateful for, and that as long as human hearts beat, there is hope. xo

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    1. Thanks, Irene, I know what you mean, and I am grateful for all that I have, just not so grateful for those who don't include everyone.

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  11. This is beautiful. I pray those of us in warm houses can find a way to welcome those who are out in the cold.

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    1. Me, too, Ruth. I hope that somehow this world can find a way to include everyone.

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  12. Such a striking metaphor you've found, and the image you chose shows it quite powerful, too.

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    1. Thanks, Karin, I'm glad you like both.

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  13. Yes, what the others say... powerful and thought-provoking. This is one matter in which I believe we need to follow our convictions and not be swayed by the doom proclaimers. We're wrestling with this in Canada too and hearing many voices.

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    1. Thanks for sharing with me, Violet. I'm sorry to hear this, but guess that fear brings surprising responses.

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  14. Very, very nice, Linda. Like a cat on a windowsill, we can only hope to bring the best of the indoors out and the outdoors in without completely shattering the glass.

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    1. Thank you Diane, and I like your analogy too.Hoping!

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  15. Linda,
    This is eloquent.
    I have to believe that others will come round to a
    clear vision, through the windows of the world.

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  16. Spot on, Linda! Wonderful poem. I'm sure I don't need to tell you you're not alone in trying to comprehend what this world... AND THIS COUNTRY has come to. I refuse to believe that those politicians are truly representing the wishes and values of most Americans. Because if they are, I'm afraid that means I will be moving back to Australia before long.

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  17. Thanks Jan and Michelle. am certainly hopeful that more will voice a kinder opinion about the refugees that need our help.

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  18. Linda, in life there are always sharp contrasts. The word whoosh singles the shift for me in the poem that is meant for us to contemplate. Marvelous work: I would love to place it in the gallery to show the contrast from brilliant hues to glistening palettes. Is that fine? (Back from Minneapolis and can take a brief breath now to read Poetry Friday pieces.)

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    1. Thanks for the compliment, Carol, but I'd rather not add it. I already have two in there. I see from the pictures that you had a wonderful time at NCTE. Happy Thanksgiving, too.

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