Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Three Stories-Three People Who Made Changes

   

              Thanks to Alyson Beecher's Non-Fiction Picture Book Challenge at Kidlit Frenzy, everyone shares wonderful non-fiction picture books.


It's also April, poetry month, and I'm attempting to write a poem every day, sometimes taking someone else's challenge, sometimes finding inspiration myself.  Here are poetic words from Eleanor Roosevelt: "You must do the things you think you cannot do." Thinking of the three people below who are to be admired for their accomplishments. 

Poem # 6

Respecting. . .
The determined-doers
soul-solvers,
persistent-players
goal-getters
caring-completers
effortless-entertainers,
and
never
quitters.
Linda Baie ©All Rights Reserved


Be sure to go here to Carol Varsalona's post at Beyond Literacy Link for line number six of Irene Latham's Progressive Poem.

            Here are three people who have found a way to make a difference in our world.


Hello, I'm Johnny Cash - G. Neri and A.G. Ford



         I liked hearing Johnny Cash sing all during my life, but never knew much about him. I knew he was well-known for singing in prisons, giving a voice to those hidden away, and that he was married to June Carter Cash, part of the famous Carter family. This book tells so much more, from his earliest years, so poor that his momma finally had to see her guitar, something J.R. (as Johnny was known) counted on to help his fears go away. He was loved for his singing even then, and people wanted to hear him often. A small battery-powered radio, a gift from his daddy, helped him hear and learn song after song. As he grew up, he worked hard in cotton fields, but wanted so much more, finally enlisting in the army during the Korean War. He had a gift of listening, was sent to listen to coded messages day after day, and learned to hum along with the beat of the Morse Code. And that was his start, money from the Army and a battered first guitar. It's an inspiring story, with lots of additional information at the back. The full color portraits by A.G. Ford bring life to the numerous scenes of Johnny Cash's life.



Miss Mary Reporting, The True Story of Sportswriter Mary Garber - Sue Macy and C.F. Payne
          I've never heard of Mary Garber until this book, but what a "splash" she made all through her life. To see a girl playing football before World War I must have been quite a surprise for people to see, but she did, and her father made sure she learned how it was played. Mary started her own news writing when she was made to write letters to her grandparents. Instead of letters, she created a newspaper of the life at the Gerber home. She went on to graduate from college, and got her break in the newsroom when most sportswriters went off to fight during World War II. She wrote sports news until she retired but continued her column for years after that. She covered all kinds of sports, the book shares, including marble shooting contests, and laid the path for women coming into the sports field when they really weren't very welcome. She is known especially for writing about the negro teams in high schools when segregated, and when they were never written about. Payne's full color double-pages show a feisty Mary in all kinds of situations, but persisting in finding a good story for her readers. I enjoyed learning about this woman that must have been wonderful to have as a friend, a ground breaker! Added information is in the back.

Hoop Genius, How A Desperate Teacher and a Rowdy Gym Class Invented Basketball - John Coy

and Joe Morse
         When I was in high school a long time ago we had to study the rules, the history and how to play every sport. This included basketball, and I loved basketball! That's why, after so many years, I still remember the story of James Naismith and how/why he invented the game of basketball. Some of the story is new to me from this book, but I loved hearing about his challenge to make this "rowdy class" like what was happening in their class, learn something new, and be excited about it. The book doesn't give much information, just the basic story, but the illustrations by Joe Morse are filled with action. It is great to see the inside covers with copies of the real rules that Naismith wrote and posted the day he started basketball! There is a bit more information at the back with a bibliography.



Happy Reading!

14 comments:

  1. These all sound really interesting! Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome, Beth. Hope you find and enjoy them.

      Delete
  2. I love all 3 of these nfpbs! Each one was written with a different voice which makes them fun to read!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, each one unique and interesting. Thanks, Michele.

      Delete
  3. And of course, James Naismith was Canadian - as a nation we might be rubbish at basketball, but one of our own invented it. ;) I like these stories of people who achieved their successes through persistence, determination and hard work - few things came easy to them, but they never let that slow them down.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I should have included that, too, Jane. I knew that he was because I remember my gym teacher emphasizing that a Canadian started it all! Yes, these stories, and others, show that they keep going no matter what! Thanks!

      Delete
  4. I love that you linked all three of these as about people who "found a way to make a difference in the world." What a great insight!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In each unique way, they did. I loved that they followed a path and fulfilled their dreams Thanks, Annette.

      Delete
  5. You are always so busy, busy, busy! These books look fantastic. I haven't read any of them. You keep my TBR list long, my friend. I loved the pictures you posted on FB today!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Ricki, happy you enjoyed "both" postings!

      Delete
  6. I really like Hoop Genius Linda. And I have to get a copy of Hello, I'm Johnny Cash to look at the artwork by A. G. Ford. I really enjoy his illustrations.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are both well done, lots of information about Johnny Cash which I liked. Hoop Genius was a find for me. I know it came out a few years ago, but I enjoyed it too. Thanks, Margie.

      Delete
  7. One of the "goal-getters" and the "determined-doers" - it would be great to know or be one of those "never quitters"!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Picture book biographies are such great ways to learn about people of history. Thank you for sharing these three. I didn't know about Neri's Cash bio, and I really like his work.

    ReplyDelete

Having a conversation is a good thing!