Thursday, March 15, 2018

Poetry Friday - Spring Roundup!

       Welcome to a poetry spring fling, only three more days until "The Earth Laughs In Flowers" according to Ralph Waldo Emerson.
       It has been quite a week of change: daylight savings time arrived, PI day and another nor'easter have come and gone, this time replaced by students' passions across the country, determined to carry on their cry for gun reform. And as I write this, it is the Ides of March, "notable for the Romans as a deadline for settling debts," and of course, Shakespeare. In another meaning, it's only the middle of a month, yet I feel a 'turning'. . .




                                                                      garden walk,
                                                                      first bee invitation 


            Recently, I discovered this older book at a library sale, full of older poems collected, as you see from the cover, for children to memorize.

            Here is one poem from long ago, to begin our spring celebration. Do you remember that this is also a song? I imagine many of you have your own favorites, have written your own poems, too. Spring seems to be a release for us, maybe not right away depending on where you live, but there are signs of sprouts, more birds flying around, and I see busy ants and ladybugs. It's on its way!
             While doing some research, I discovered that Al Jolson used words from this poem in his famous song April Showers. Robert Loveman was also the poet for the Georgia state song, Georgia until 1979 when the state changed it to Georgia On My Mind.

April Rain
         Robert Loveman

It is not raining rain for me,
It's raining daffodils;
In every dimpled drop I see
Wild flowers on the hills.

The clouds of gray engulf the day
And overwhelm the town;
It is not raining rain to me,
It's raining roses down.

It is not raining rain to me,
But fields of clover bloom,
Where any buccaneering bee
Can find a bed and room.

A health unto the happy,
A fig for him who frets!
It is not raining rain to me,
It's raining violets.

         Leave your links below!



69 comments:

  1. Rich pickings and close observations in your post on this Poetry Friday, Linda. I enjoyed the lost treasures found in your browsing as well as the March connections in your introduction. The connection to Al Jolson and his allusion to Robert Loveman's poem added to my understanding of both of them. Thank you for hosting and thank you for this most stimulating post.

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    1. Thank you, Alan. It was interesting to discover the connections and more about this poet/song writer.

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  2. And now I will be humming my way through the evening....what a lovely anticipation of spring. I hope that our Northeast friends feel some warmth from our posts. They seem to be still digging out.
    This Poetry Friday I am discovering Eavan Boland, Irish poet....modern, female and spot on in her view of the world over at https://awordedgewiselindamitchell.blogspot.com/
    Thank you for hosting this week, Linda. You are a treasure.

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    1. You're welcome to the spring music, Linda. I'm interested to see your post. I have some memories of liking Eavan Boland's poetry, but don't remember what!

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  3. What a warm, welcome, sweet-smelling wind of a post. Thanks for those flower-laughs. I'll have to imagine them since more snow is forecast.

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    1. Oh no, and we continue to wish for some! Hope you're staying in a good place by a fire! Thanks, Brenda!

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  4. Yes, spring is on the way! I love your dandelion photo and poem. The Loveman poem is just perfect after a rainy, dreary February that is finally turning to March and flowers starting to bloom!

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    1. Thanks, Kay, glad to spread a little sunshine for everyone.

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  5. I feel a "turning" too, Linda! Thank you for hosting and giving us a glimpse of spring. Such interesting research about the poem songs as well!

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    1. Thank you, Kiesha. Spring, as poets write, is such a fickle time. Who knows what next week will bring?

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  6. Linda, you've captured recent days and this "turning" time of year so beautifully... thanks for hosting this week! I'm surfacing with a "Submarine Spring" poem at my place...

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    1. Thanks, Robyn, it's a different kind of time, I think, on the "brink" if you will. I enjoy the uncertainty!

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  7. Spring can't get here soon enough! I hope you'll share more gems from your book sale find. I see it's book four--I wonder how many volumes there were in the complete set?

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    1. I thought of your weather as I wrote, Diane. We may still get a big snow, but it has been a strange winter for us, as you know. As for the book, I cannot find a set, but have found book six, so perhaps six? It's a fun book, with quite long poems to memorize! Thanks, Diane.

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  8. Linda ~ How I admire concise prose and concise poetry! Your two line poem is spot-on. And you'd think--with my name--that I'd know Robert Loveman's poem and the song--but it's new to me! Thanks for introducing me!

    TeachingAuthors' round-robin this time is on Women's History Month. I struggle to write a poem that captures the strength and charisma of Marjory Stoneman Douglas...and humbly offer my rough drafts. Please come by and write your own poems about her...sometimes it takes a village to get it right!
    http://www.teachingauthors.com/2018/03/marjory-stoneman-douglas-activist-wow.html

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    1. Thanks, April, I'd hoped you would be here today! I knew of the song, but not the actual poem & poet. Your post sounds lovely and inspiring. I will be sure to come!

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    2. Linda ~ my post is live now. Thanks for the heads-up...I made a last-minute change last night and forgot to push "Publish"!

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    3. Terrific! Will get there soon!

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  9. I love the optimism of the April Showers poem and your bee-invitation poem is delightful. I keep thinking we're making a turn toward spring and then we get another foot of snow. Ah well, it sure is beautiful! Thanks so much for hosting this week!

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    1. I know that you in the east are getting the worst, hope "your" spring arrives very soon, Molly. Thanks!

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  10. Charming post, Linda! Have you made it safely through the Ides of March? Thanks so much for hosting!

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    1. Thanks, Tabatha, it's a special time to be a host I think. Yes, the Ides, thus far have been good indeed, albeit the news, always the news. And I just discovered that it is raining. I am happy, as are the trees and plants and grass!

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    2. Ah, the news! Thank goodness for nature.

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  11. What better way to welcome spring than with poetry! Thank you for hosting PF today, Linda, and for celebrating that glimpse of a first bee invitation. The azaleas here are in full bloom!

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    1. Ah, the varieties of our weather amaze! Enjoy your beautiful flowers, Michelle, as I look forward to ours! Thank you!

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  12. Love the positivism of your post, Linda - what a perfect poem to share! I was all set to jump into spring 2 weeks ago...and then we got hit with 3 nor'easters in 2 weeks and my optimistic outlook was obliterated. (sigh...) But at least we have folks like you cheering us up!

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    1. I understand your plight, would feel the same way. It's tiring, no matter the beauty! Thanks, Matt, hope all is clear soon!

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  13. Thank you, Linda, for hosting this week. Your post is a lovely celebration of the coming of spring! I must admit that I dig dandelions out of my yard with mixed emotions. And what a great book find. I love old books and the treasures in them; I collect old books.

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    1. I leave the dandelions as long as they bloom. They are the first food for bees in the spring. Then I do dig them up. And they return elsewhere of course. Thanks, Alice. I wish you could visit the bookstore-lots of old books there!

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  14. This is food for the soul today, raining daffodils, raining violets. I needed that. Thank you for hosting, dear Linda. :)

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    1. You are welcome, Myra. Happy to bring a few raining flowers your way!

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  15. Thank you for hosting this wonderful "poetry spring fling," Linda! I love your hopeful dandelion! Isn't it fun to find forgotten gems like "April Rain?" I doubt I'll be seeing too many flowers any time soon, but the snow is melting and the robins are back. Sure signs that spring will get here eventually!

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    1. I'm glad you are seeing those robins, despite the nor'easter rages. Hard to believe the repeats! Thanks, Catherine.

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  16. The first signs of spring for me are RIGHT HERE! Thank you, Linda. Your inviting dandelion makes the bee in me rejoice! And raining flowers...yes please! Thank you for hosting with such joy and beauty. xxxx

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    1. You're welcome, Amy. It was a delight to spy that dandelion!

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  17. Linda, I am excited that you are showcasing spring in such a grand style and look waht's happening in your garden! Love that photo of a spring flower Your post is encouraging me to go a little faster to unveil Winter Wonderland Gallery. My post is full of snow. Can you believe we have one more nor'easter on its way?

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    1. I have heard that another storm is on its way. I think we received the 'edge' of it last night, a little bit of rain. Yikes, what a winter for you all in the east! I'll look forward to that Winter Gallery, Carol!

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  18. There's a better way to look at rain. Instead of thinking of all the gray, this year I'll envision all the color ahead.

    I love alliteration and Loveman certainly used it with great skill in each stanza.

    March does open the door to change. Let's hope it also opens the door to some common sense solutions for protecting our kids. I'm so impressed by the message of these young leaders.

    Thanks for hosting, Linda. Always happy when I stop by your blog.

    Oh, I almost forgot to share my poem:
    Shamrock http://merelydaybyday.blogspot.com/2018/03/slice-of-life-shamrock-16-of-31.html

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    1. Oops! Sharing above. (It's very early, and I'm still enjoying my first cup of coffee.)

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    2. Thanks, Cathy, I do hope, too, that the rest of March brings all kinds of wonderful color!

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  19. Such a delightful poem. It's not raining rain. :) And the invitation on your garden walk is lovely. We are enjoying some mild weather, as our Autumn flits between summer storms and winter wind.

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    1. Yes, I guess we're in similar, mercurial time, Kat. Wishing you a lovely autumn as we move into spring. Thanks!

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  20. Beautiful poem! Thank you for hosting this week. Here is my link:
    https://kimberlyhutmacherwrites.blogspot.com/2018/03/poetry-corner-rhyme.html

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    1. You're welcome, Kimberly. Enjoy all the poetry today!

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  21. Yay for spring, and thank you for hosting, Linda! This poem makes me think of Langston Hughes' "April Rain Song." I love old books like that... what a treasure! Although we are a bit weary of rain around here... definitely looking forward to that "out like a lamb." xo

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    1. Thanks, Irene. I'm glad you shared another favorite 'rain' poem. I do wonder what March's end will bring.

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  22. Thanks for the taste of spring, Linda. I'm sharing some springtime with Billy Collins today.

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    1. You're welcome, Karen. Ah, Billy Collins always gets his topic right! Looking forward to reading!

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  23. Thanks for hosting! Happy Friday!

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    1. You're welcome, hope you have a great Friday, too!

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  24. Thanks for the lovely "daffodils, buccaneering bees" and "violets" from Robert Loveman–and that domineering dandelion too! Springs showing her signs here in the Windy City, but kicking up her boots and taking her sweet time. I'm happy to hear the robins have returned with their sweet songs. Thanks also for hosting the Roundup Linda, and speaking again of our brave and resounding student voices!

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    1. I want those students to stay in our minds, Michelle, hoping the news cycle stays with them. Thanks, glad to here you have a few spring things happening!

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  25. Testing, testing, just trying to see if I can leave a comment today. :) Maybe if I include the word cookie here?

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    1. I did check my comment rules, and they have stayed the same. Who knows how it happens sometimes? Thanks, Jama!

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    2. Jama ~ of COURSE you need to add a fresh-baked "cookie" to your post!

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  26. I didn't realize Spring is few days away until I read your post. I had enough of snow this winter and what a lovely welcome poem you shared to us. Thank you for hosting Poetry Friday.

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    1. You're welcome! Enjoy everyone's posts as you can. There are some lovely ones! And Happy Spring!

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  27. Love this poem to kick off spring. Thanks for sharing it, Linda. It's not one I know.
    Thanks also for your comment on my sonnet last week--I've been offline and haven't had a chance to respond until today. Hope the weather starts acting like spring here, soon!

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    1. You're welcome, Carmela, and thanks for coming by! I hope you'll get some good spring weather soon!

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  28. Thank you for hosting today, Linda. Dandelions are my all time favorite flower, so your poem made me smile.

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    1. Thanks, Rebecca. I was so excited to see it, too. And it is a favorite flower to me as well.

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  29. I do love that last verse! At this point, I'll take Spring rain over March snow any day!

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    1. I realize that all of you in the east have really had enough winter. I hope this next week is the last of it for you! Glad you like that final verse.

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  30. Love that cheeky little dandelion and your two-line haiku! Bring on the bees! Bring on SPRING!

    Thanks for hosting us this week!

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    1. You're welcome, Mary Lee. It was a spring gift to see that yellow in the midst of brown!

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  31. Thank you for hosting! Now to be happy instead of fretting!

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    1. Indeed you should! I do like the word 'fret' though. It seems like just a small frown. Thanks, Ruth.

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  32. Happy (almost) spring, Linda! In 5 words you have encapsulated exactly how I am feeling as spring approaches (hovering around freezing here for the next week, ugh). You are always a ray of warmth on the internet, so thank you for that. =)

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    1. Aw, you're welcome, Bridget. I imagine this March is a huge change for you and your family! Spring will arrive for you, just a little later, right? Glad to hear from you!

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