Sunday, January 4, 2015

It's Monday-First of 2015

                  First Monday of 2015, time to share the latest books and link to our hosts: Jen at TeachMentorTexts and Kellee and Ricki at Unleashing ReadersSheila at Book Journeys started a meme to share all kinds of books read each Monday, then Kellee, Ricki and Jen formed theirs for only children's lit. Come visit, and tweet at #IMWAYR.



           This story tells about a young boy who plays and loves the violin, but whose father is the manager of a losing team in the Negro Baseball League. He insists his son has to get outside and stop playing his “fiddle” inside, thus Reginald has to go along to become the team’s bat boy. During the time he isn’t needed, he begins to practice his violin. Magic happens because the players relax and begin playing better. The story helps young children have a beginning look at this time in 1948 when the end of this league is coming. The better players are slowly moving to the white leagues. (Jackie Robinson was first.)  The weaving of a father/son conflict with the history is told well. It’s a good and interesting story. Lewis’ illustrations are lovely watercolor showing a variety of scenes that accompany the story.




         It’s a book to “see” rather than hear about, a book to read to the little ones and then giggle, giggle, giggle. They will love it, and understand it, be ready to help when asked! This will be a terrific book to teach prediction and to enjoy anticipation.



             With the happiest of illustrations and humorous rhyme, little girl Wilma Le Wu searches for a name that fits. She thinks her name is boring! At the Change Your Name store, she chooses more than one name that sounds wonderful, and off to France, Bahrain, Belize and Africa she goes. Those places happen to be wonderful, but just don’t fit Wilma. After the exploration, a satisfactory solution is found. Read the book to see if you guessed the ending! It’s a great story for discussing names and interesting names that come from other countries or cultures. Some may even be a classmate’s name!

                It’s a clever story of a family whose computer breaks (oh no!), & down from the attic come that lonely typewriter. We discover what this strange machine is, how it works (no screen, no plug, no batteries), but it saves the day for Pablo who needs to write a report on penguins. And it adds a few fond memories for the older ones in the family. The graphic look of the illustrations are interesting, and of course the text is in a typewriter font-what else?


                   Immigrants hang out at certain street corners to get picked up for a day’s work, hard work, but never guaranteed to be more than a day. This story tells of Francisco’s abuelo (grandfather) who just arrived in the U.S., who doesn’t speak English, so Francisco goes along to help him get work. Unfortunately, he lies to a man about their gardening skills and they make a terrible mistake. Francisco learns about honor no matter what the need is, and they do get a second chance. This would make a good conversation about immigrants and the hard work they do, but also about doing what is right.

What's Next, What's New? Still reading The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop by Lewis Buzbee. At school, reading Steve Sheinkin's Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny & The Fight for Civil Rights.

30 comments:

  1. Linda - your link on #IMWAYR takes us back to Teach Mentor Texts! Some of these picture books have been on my radar so I really appreciate the detailed reviews.

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    1. Oops! Thank you, changed... Glad you found some you thought would be good!

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  2. Some really wonderful books here. I'll definitely check out the Change Your Name Store - we have a unit on genealogy and immigration coming up that this might fit well!

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    1. I've had students write about their names before & this would be great for that & your unit, too, Katie.

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  3. I keep hoping to find This Book Just Ate My Dog at the bookstore or library. Might have to just purchase it for myself!

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    1. I found it at Target, sat down & read it, Elisabeth. But I know that my young granddaughters will love it, may still have to buy it!

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  4. Oh how I wish we had kept our typewriter. I think I will have to grab up that book. There's something wonderful about an old typewriter.

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    1. I did get rid of an ancient typewriter, but still have my college one. I should take it in to see what the students think. It was a fun book, Crystal!

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  5. Oh, I like the sounds of that typewriter one. Haven't heard of it before so I will definitely have to check it out. Do you know we have The Bat Boy & His Violin in our school collection. It's one I keep meaning to read and haven't gotten to. Must remedy that. I am a violin player ... albeit one that doesn't practice like I should!

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    1. I hope you get it soon & enjoy it. I found the story good.

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  6. My favorite thing about The Lonely Typewriter was that the family in the story was biracial with almost no fanfare. We need more books like that.

    This Book Just Ate My Dog was one of my favorite picture books of 2014. Loved it!

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    1. You're right about The Lonely Typewriter, a good thing! Yes, This Book Just Ate My Dog is wonderful! Thanks, Beth.

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  7. These all look terrific, Linda! As someone who made a fair amount of money typing papers for people in college, I can't wait to read The Lonely Typewriter!

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    1. I think it would be fun to read the typewriter book & bring in one to some younger classes. It is a slice of history for sure. Thanks, Catherine!

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  8. Linda,
    You always have such great book lists. I loved "The Book Just Ate My Dog." I want to see the "Change Your Name Store" and "The Lonely Typewriter."

    Cathy

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    1. Thanks, Cathy, hope you enjoy them all. Your younger class will love each one!

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  9. I love Eve Bunting, but I haven't heard of this one. Thank you for sharing it and the other titles!

    Happy reading this week :)

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    1. Thanks, Kellee, I keep finding new ones by Eve Bunting, too!

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  10. Your collection of picture books read make me realize that I have not read any in quite some time, Linda - time to fix that!

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    1. You know I love them. I read Sam & Dave Dig A Hole to my older students & they loved it. We had quite a fun conversation about it. Thanks, Tara.

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  11. Love your collection of picture books, Linda! There are several that I have never heard of! Thank you!

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    1. You're welcome, Melanie. Hope you find a few to have fun with!

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  12. Great picture books! I'm glad I came across Boy/Violin through Jennifer Serravallo's book. I would like to use it the way she mentions - having kids write some quick thoughts to check comprehension. I know you can do with any book, but I think this book has a lot of possibilities!

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    1. Thanks for the idea, Michele. I'll share this with those who are teaching younger students! Happy you enjoyed these!

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  13. I love Eve Bunting's work. I haven't read anything that doesn't take a group off into serious conversations. Riding the Tiger is one of my favourite critical literacy picture books.

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    1. Thanks for another title, cheriee. I don't think I know it!

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  14. Ah, I will have to investigate The Lonely Typewriter. My favorite font is American Typewriter! : )

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    1. It's a great book. Have fun with it!

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  15. I am definitely pinning A Day's Work - it sounds like a beautiful book to add to my current course module on multicultural texts. Eve Bunting writes such hauntingly-beautiful stories.

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    1. Yes, it will fit there well, Myra. And the story will please you I think.

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Having a conversation is a good thing!