Thursday, November 16, 2017

A Journey for Thanksgiving

Thanks to Jane, who really is a Rain City Librarian, for hosting Poetry Friday. If you don't know, Jane recently had her first book published. Here's a pic of the cover! Congratulations, Jane!



      I had quite a journey trying to share one poem with everyone. I am in the midst of unpacking a few Christmas things. One of the first things I do is bring out the books, especially for the grand-girls, but some for me, too. This time, I found an old Cricket Magazine from 1987, but with the Thanksgiving theme. It was tucked inside a bigger book! Inside is a poem that I loved by a poet named Emanuel di Pasquale, the title: "Joy of an Immigrant, a Thanksgiving." It is a beautiful poem, and I wanted to share considering the turmoil that immigrants today are experiencing all over the world. They are looking for their "nests".
      When I looked for the poem, I found something about the poet here. And the Academy of American Poets offers this: Emanuel di PasqualeBorn in Sicily in 1943, Emanuel di Pasquale came to America in 1957. He earned an MA from New York University in 1966 and has been teaching college English ever since. There is more here.
       I am sharing this information because I checked the Cricket Magazine that does show that Pasquale gave permission to share his poem. He was alive then, and still is. Then I found a text of this poem that I can share, but it states: "Here's a poem supposedly written by one of the pilgrims." It's an interesting journey to "think" one has an answer, then when exploring more, one questions, and looks again, hopefully discovering the truth.  
       

Joy of an Immigrant, a Thanksgiving by Emanuel Pasquale

begins:
          "Like a bird grown weak in a land
            where it always rains
            and where all the trees have died,

Here is the link to the rest of the poem. 

Happy Thanksgiving to all who are celebrating. I am thankful for so many things, but one of those high on my list is the Poetry Friday community.

30 comments:

  1. "a land where my song can echo."
    Beautiful, Linda. Thank you for sharing.

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    1. You're welcome, Sally. I'm glad I discovered it!

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  2. That cricket cover looks familiar to me. Thanks for this timely, sensitive, and uplifting poem Linda. I hope that we reopen the US floodgates to many immigrants that are seeking a place of refuge.

    I too am thankful for the rich Poetry Friday community, and look forward to it each week; Happy Thanks Giving!

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    1. The cover is years old, so perhaps they've re-used it! Thanks, Michelle. The poem fits our world today as it did years ago!

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  3. I echo Sally, "a land where my song can echo". Please God, may we never lose the music. What a gorgeous addition to Poetry Friday. Thank you for sharing. I've been away.....and missed all my PF peeps intensely. It is good to see this post. I am grateful.

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    1. Thanks, Linda, I'm glad to see you back, and to hear about your travels!

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  4. What a beautiful poem--and may we all learn to welcome those weary birds who land near us, seeking a better life of safety and love and home.

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  5. "I have flown long and long/ to find sunlight pouring over branches." Gorgeous. Have a wonderful gathering next week, Linda!

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    1. Thanks, Laura, wishing you a sweet Thanksgiving, too!

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  6. Thanks so much for sharing this beautiful and timely poem, Linda. I love "a land where my song can echo." Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family!

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    1. You're welcome, Jama. It touched me, too. Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours as well!

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  7. There's something so haunting about that last line, Linda. What a lovely find!

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    1. I wish everyone could be touched by this poem, Tara. I loved finding it. Happy Thanksgiving to all of you this week!

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  8. I'm thankful for my dry nest. I wasn't born in it. Most of us live in houses we weren't born in. Doesn't that say it all?

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    1. Indeed it does, Brenda. And me, too!

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  9. And it's up to us to keep that sunlight pouring over branches...nice one, Linda, and thankful for you too!

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    1. Thanks, Heidi, I agree, hoping we can do a lot of helping others this year.

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  10. Some things are always true, like the desire for a dry nest and the necessity to give thanks. Happy Thanksgiving, Linda!

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    1. Thank you, Tabatha, it is something important to think about as we ready ourselves to begin a new year.

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  11. Isn't it amazing what treasures we can come across accidentally just in time? Thanks for sharing this. Have a happy Thanksgiving!

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    1. Thanks, Donna, yes, I agree, and it only takes time to pay attention.

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  12. "a land where a song can echo." So much carried in those words. Just beautiful. Thank-you for sharing. I too am thankful for this wonderful community of poets and appreciators.

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    1. I'm happy you enjoyed the poem, Kat! Thanks!

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  13. Timely indeed, Linda. Thank you for sharing and for the introduction to the poet! Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours. XO

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    1. You're welcome, Robyn; have a wonderful Thanksgiving with your family!

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  14. You finding this poem is serendipity I think, Linda. A lot to ponder especially because I now have a different perspective on what it means to be an immigrant. I am thankful to you and your blog. Happy (early) Thanksgiving! =)

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    1. Oh Bridget, and now you are building a different nest from any you've had before. I hope you and your family are doing well, and have a Happy Thanksgiving in your new home. Thanks for coming by!

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