Thursday, September 12, 2019

#Poetry Friday - By the Light of the Moon


          This full-moon Friday of September, Laura Purdie Salas hosts this Poetry Friday at her blog, Writing The World for Kids. Thanks to Laura, there is a wonderful moon book ready to excite children about this particular Friday because of the full moon and If You Were the Moon. This 'early' harvest moon, on Friday, the 13th, is the first one connecting these two things since 2000 and will not happen again until 2049! 

        Today, she's also getting us ready by sharing her newest book, Snack, Snooze, Skedaddle-How Animals Get Ready for Winter which I reviewed here. We might take some hints from this book as we head toward October! Laura's also asking what things we do to prepare and hosting a giveaway, too!



      I love the moon, have moon journaled with my students, written more than one poem about it, feel more energy when the moon is waxing. Yes, I do! This time I am sharing a poem I discovered in an old anthology that was donated at the used bookstore where I volunteer. If you didn't know, it is non-profit and run entirely by volunteers, a special place! Here's the book, and the poem.
         
                                                             The Moon-Sheep
The moon seems like a docile sheep,
She pastures while all people sleep;
But sometimes, when she goes astray,
She wanders all alone by day.

Up in the clear blue morning air
We are surprised to see her there,
Grazing in her woolly white,
Waiting the return of night.

When dusk lets down the meadow bars
She greets again her lambs, the stars!

     When I researched the poem, I discovered this lovely book by Christopher Morley full of other poems by him on Project Gutenberg. You can read more about him here at The Poetry Foundation where it reads that these words were added to his obituary by Morley himself. “Read, every day, something no one else is reading. Think, every day, something no one else is thinking. Do, every day, something no one else would be silly enough to do. It is bad for the mind to continually be part of unanimity.”

22 comments:

  1. What a wonderful discovery! I love the metaphor. "Grazing in her wooly white" is exactly right! Thank you for sharing this treasure with us, Linda!

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    1. You're welcome, Catherine. Enjoy all the new poems!

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  2. Catherine is right - this is a wonderful and I so glad it's on Project Gutenberg. I always looking for short, simple poems to share with my young readers. And I love the one you chose for today - a good moon poem, like the moon itself, is so irresistible, isn't it?

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    1. I'm glad to share, Alex. Yes, I will go out somewhere tonight to watch that moon rise! Enjoy all those poems, and thank you!

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  3. I love how the poem compares the moon with a sheep – while it has a lively rhythm, it also leads us on a gentle meandering journey. And I really like the quote you shared by Morley, especially this last line: "It is bad for the mind to continually be part of unanimity.” Yes, vive la difference!
    Thanks for a wonderful Moon filled post Linda.

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    1. You're welcome, Michelle. When I began to follow that path to more of Morley I was so excited, to read some other of his poems, then to find that quote. It's such a pleasure to find words from someone in the past to love. Yes, vive la difference! Thank you!

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  4. O how frisky, to think of stars as the moon's lambs! Wonderful find. Wish I could browse in your charity bookplate with you helping point the way & see the treasure trove dear Linda.

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    1. It is a fun thought, I agree, Jan. The store is always a pleasure and yields wonderful books, if nothing else but to browse for a while. Thanks!

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  5. Oh, I love this poem. I'm going to take it as a possible for my poetry pandemonium this coming spring. I think kids will love this!

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    1. I bet they will, too, Linda, a new way of looking at that old moon! Thanks!

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  6. Moon sheep and lamb stars! Love these images and the fact that Morley wanted that quote to be part of his obituary.

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    1. I am glad that I found the book, then the poem and Morley! The quote is wonderful to me, too, Joyce. Thank you

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  7. Linda, thank you for the book shout-out, and thank you for the poem and especially the quote you shared. I always love a daytime moon and am somehow shocked to see it up there--every time:>) That quote is such good advice for life! xox

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    1. Yes, I agree about the quote. Happy to share your book, Laura. It is a wonderful new one about the moon. Thank you

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  8. Oh, what a delightful poem! So enjoyed this post; your love for "mooning" :D is so palpable.

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  9. This poem is even more meaningful b/c of Tara's journey w/ her sheep. I love seeing her sheep and updates. It's so fun to discover old books nd poems that still speak to us. Someday, I plan to visit Denver, you, and your bookshop. I love the quote and now I'm off to explore the links you shared.

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    1. Yes, I should send the poem to Tara, thought of her when I read it, Ramona. I'd love to have a visit from you! Someday? Enjoy the links and isn't the quote just perfect? Thanks!

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  10. Lovely! I've long wanted to write a poem about the daylight moon.

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    1. I'm glad you like it, Liz. Yes, a different look when imagining the moon in the day. Thanks!

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  11. I love the quote, Linda. I used to moon journal with my students too. There used to be a book I used about moon journaling. I can't remember the title now, but it was a lovely book with great ideas for moon journaling ideas. I gave a lot of my teaching books away when I retired. I wish I had kept that one.

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    1. I do still have it, Linda, if it's the same one you're thinking of. We're on the same page with that book. It is a treasure that I still browse now and then. It is Moon Journals by Joni Chancer. I've given most of my teaching books away, but kept it & a few others. I'm glad you like the quote. Me, too! Thanks!

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