Saturday, April 21, 2012

Following Amy at The Poem Farm's Dictionary Hike


         I finally thought that I would try the dictionary poem hike that Amy Ludwig VanDerwater is doing this month on her blog, The Poem Farm.  I can't begin to equal her expertise, but she is also inspiring and  I wanted to see what happened with this Dictionary Hike!  I used a loved and favorite American Heritage dictionary.

          The word I found when I randomly opened my dictionary and pointed to “grave”, definition number three.  It said: to sculpt or carve, engrave.  And the sentence example is from Oscar Wilde: I wish I could grave my sonnets on an ivory tablet.  How wonderful is that!  One can be serious or humorous with this word.  Did Wilde mean he was aiming for a new IPad so he could create an e-book?  Whatever the answer, I just learned a new word.  The definition also said that the word can be like to be used or fixed permanently, as in words or ideas. 
           It seems to me that is a good definition of a poem.


Poets listen and heed me well,
April’s wordsmithing soon will end.
Time to grave your words, the bells
which rang called you to send.

Wrote the cruelest month by Eliot,
yet if you grave your words and share
you’ll find you have such prescience
in observing the growth you bared.

Grave the tablets, the journal pages
in spiral notebooks, or general stock.
Your words will live for future ages
and none will have been written for naught.

15 comments:

  1. Grave the tablets, the journal pages
    in spiral notebooks, or general stock.
    Your words will live for future ages
    and none will be written for naught.

    Now THAT is one to paste on the first page of a writing journal for inspiration and motivation. Yo are a brave soul to take on so many poetry challenges this April, Linda! What fun to be able to listen in on your adventure!

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    1. Thanks, Tara. It is a nice thought to think some of our words will live on.

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  2. Wilde and an iPad tablet - that would be a sight to behold. I love the last line of your poem, it reminds us to keep the faith as we write, write and continue to write.

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    1. Thank you Myra. It tickled me to think of what poet, like Wilde, might love an IPad!

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  3. This is such perfect advice - the beginning of the poem such an invitation, and your use of "grave" is so solemn and true and kind. I'm off to "grave" my pages today... I linked to you at the blog and on FB! Thank you! a.

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    1. Thank you, Amy! It was a big challenge, & you make it look so easy!

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  4. How wonderful that you're joining the hike! If Amy does it again next year, I may join in as well as I have so enjoyed watching it unfold. I didn't know this definition of grave either, and I love how you repeated it in each stanza. Well done! :)

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    1. Thanks for coming by Renee. I'm not sure I will do it every day, but it was fun to try at least this time. Maybe one more time?

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  5. This is so well done. The use of grave is beautiful, but all your word choice in this poem is powerful. Love it all!

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    1. Thanks Betsy. I had hoped I would choose something more light and airy! Not to be this time.

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  6. Love that last stanza Linda.

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    1. Thank you, Dana. Time for everyone to treasure their words.

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  7. Nicely done, and it looks like quite a challenge! I like "time to grave your words". I'll have to check out Amy's blog and maybe try one...if I can find my dictionary!

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    1. I was hoping for a more 'usual' word, but this did give me a few moments of "what in the world...". Thanks Donna!

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  8. "and none will be written for naught."

    Process, process, process!

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