Thursday, January 5, 2017

New Year Welcome

Welcome to the first Poetry Friday of 2017.

"And now let us welcome the new year—full of things that have never been." — Rainer Maria Rilke.
          Including this first Poetry Friday of 2017! For those who follow some holidays after Christmas, Firday is Epiphany, Three King’s Day, or The Twelfth Day of Christmas.  

          I have known the above quote for a long time (perhaps you have, too?). And I
use it in some way on every year beginning. This year, it feels both dark and light, considering my concerns about the coming change in our government, yet I know there will be marvelous things to celebrate too. A few years ago it became more special. A friend of mine gave me A Year With Rilke, translated and edited by Joanna Macy and Anita Barrows and I began morning reads from this anthology, thoughtful, sometimes seeming to apply to my life so closely that it made me shiver. Other days I read and passed on by. Here at the beginning of the new year, words fly about with OLWs, resolutions, wonderful poems, and quotes. I actually started a file to keep some that I’ve especially loved.

Today I’ll share one of the poems from A Year With Rilke, a favorite for beginnings. This also connects to me because I want to say thank you to Mary Lee Hahn and Catherine Flynn for their challenges that began December 1st, #haikuforhealing and #commonplacemarvels. It was a pleasant thing to slide into this daily writing, and we have continued. If you’d like to join, some share on Facebook, but most are sharing on twitter. Take a look! Also, I joined Jone MacCulloch’s poetry postcard greet the new year group, and it’s wonderful to find a poem in my mailbox!  



 
Entering, from Book of Images

Whoever you may be: step into the evening.
Step out of the room where everything is known.
Whoever you are,
your house is the last before the far-off.
With your eyes, which are almost too tired
to free themselves from the familiar,
you slowly take one black tree
and set it against the sky: slender, alone.
And you have made a world.
It is big
and like a word, still ripening in silence.
And though your mind would fabricate its meaning,
your eyes tenderly let go of what they see.


Sign up with your link, and have a perfect Poetry Friday. We’ve had winter return these past few days, and I imagine the storm is on its way to those in the Midwest and East. Keep warm, make soup, and revel in the beauty!


72 comments:

  1. Thanks for hosting! I had two wonderful postcards from Joy Acey and Diane Mayr, which I shared on twitter. Such fun to get poetry in the mail. I had fun writing mine, too. I find Rainer Maria Rilke very inspiring. I have a volume I'm reading, in between taking Mary Oliver breaks. This week, though, I find myself drawn to Herman Melville, of all people. Perhaps with the inauguration looming, I find the need of words from a poet who lived through an even more tumultuous and frightening time in our history. Happy New Year and many blessings to you and yours.

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    1. I didn't remember about sharing the postcards, and just did, Brenda. Yours was the first one I received. What a wonderful winter poem and picture by Anna. I hope you will be sharing the Melville that you are enjoying!

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    2. Yes, the Melville was such a pleasure. He wove superstitions and sea dog chanties into beautiful poetry. I was moved by Shiloh when I read it years ago. It's a classic, but there a lot more there. He was quite prolific. I had to stop and think and think some more. I love it when that happens.

      I'm glad you liked Anna's art and my little Penguin ditty. You don't have to share the postcard. It was a gift. XOXO

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    3. I will put Melville on my growing poetry list! And I did share; it is a pleasure.

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  2. Thanks for hosting. It's been great writing alongside you this past month, and I'm glad you (and others) will be continuing!

    Love the Rilke poem, and thanks for leading off the Poetry Friday celebrations for 2017.

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    1. You're welcome, Mary Lee. I've loved writing with you and everyone, too. What joy you've brought with your idea. Thanks again!

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  3. Happy New Year, Linda B. Wow, what a velvety beginning to Poetry Friday. Rilke is perfect for this day, your post. I've so loved #haikuforhealing. I made it through a month. Stopped. But, I may pick back up again as it's fun and renewing in it's way. Poetry Friday Eve is the best. We are waiting for snow here as well. I will find a tree and make it a world for a while if I have some time to think and write tomorrow. Have a great week.

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    1. Thanks, Linda, I know you took that "extra" step of adding pictures with your haiku. I did that much less, but it has been wonderful to do. I hope you do find that tree! Enjoy the poetry today and tomorrow, too!

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  4. Linda, thank you for your warm welcome to the 2017 PF round-up! Such a great quote to carry with us all year long through days of dark and light. Thanks again for kicking the year off for us!

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    1. You are very welcome, Kiesha. It will be terrific to read everyone's posts these two days! I'm glad you like the quote!

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  5. Oh, you've kicked things off in such a beautiful way, Linda! Thank you, and Happy New Year!

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    1. You're welcome, Jane. Happiest of the New Year to you, too!

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  6. What a beautiful way to start the Poetry Friday year. Thank you!

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    1. You're welcome, Sally. I'm happy you enjoyed it.

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  7. Oh, this is gorgeous. "your house is the last before the far-off." Dreamy. Thanks for this thoughtful first Poetry Friday of 2017!

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    1. You're welcome, Laura. Glad you liked this poem. Me, too!

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  8. I have been watching and reading (but not writing) #haikuforhealing but have not seen the other hashtag. I may have to dust off the haiku pens and give this a try.

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    1. I hope you join us, LeighAnne. I'll look for you!

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  9. Thanks for hosting, Linda! I'm happy that my postcard arrived. I think reading a little Rilke each day sounds like a great goal for 2017--I may have find my own copy!

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    1. You're welcome, and thanks again for the creative postcard. I need to explore how to do one online! Hope you'll find the Rilke. It's lovely.

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  10. No person I'd rather greet this year with than you, dear Linda - such a perfect poem and post. "like a word/still ripening in silence" and "your eyes tenderly let go of what they see." - exquisite. And, per the quote at the page top, sending lots of kind thoughts your way to join kind words in your post and comments -- the weather map tells me your neck of the woods could use some warmth! XO

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    1. Best of the new year to you. I wish I could drive across town to meet you at your shop! Yes, supposed to be below zero today, and we've had lots of snow, but really light and feathery, not too bad. Thanks, Robyn!

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  11. Thank you for hosting such a warm welcome to a year of poetry. I love the poem, especially the reminder that my house is the last before the far-off. I look forward to checking out the hashtags for more poetry inspiration, tool

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    1. You're very welcome, Kay. I love that line, too, rather other-worldly. Enjoy the haiku when you can.

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  12. Rilke is perfect for both the uncertainty and hopefulness a new year brings...thanks for sharing, and for hosting!

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    1. You're welcome, Matt. Wishing you a wonderful new year with your writing and your family.

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  13. Rilke is a favorite, and I love these words: "Step out of the room where everything is known." Writing #haikuforhealing felt like that at first, but thanks to such supportive writing friends, it became much easier as the month went one. Thank you for hosting today, Linda!

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    1. You're welcome, Catherine, so glad you enjoyed the poem.

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  14. I decided to "embrace challenges" by contributing to Poetry Friday. We received that snowfall you mentioned and it inspired my words today.

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    1. Hurrah (for the writing, not the snow unless you need it). I look forward to your poem, Leigh Anne!

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  15. Thank you for Rilke's words, Linda...although I have to confess that they do not lift my spirits much, these dark days before who knows what. But, we must stay aware and active citizens if we are to protect what we value, and so I take comfort in that. Thanks for hosting, my friend.

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    1. I have a friend who has formed a group with her husband and they are helping with things to do, like calling representatives, etc. I'm giving to certain organizations and signing petitions. And yelling with my daughter! We'll keep on, Tara, we will! It is quite amazing, though, isn't it? I'm still in some disbelief. Hugs to you at this time!

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  16. I love Rilke. Thank you for sharing. I am not in search of that book. :)Happy New Year Linda and thanks for hosting.

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  17. I love Rilke, but don't know this poem. Thank you for sharing it and for hosting this shindig!

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    1. You're welcome, Tricia.Enjoy your day!

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  18. Happy official Poetry Friday New Year entry, Linda. Thank you for hosting. Your post was inviting and had all sorts of warm feelings as opposed to the cold temperatures that you have been feeling in Colorado. I hope your soup was delicious and just what you needed. The Rilke poem was a wonderful lead-in to the PF festivities. I like Brenda's comments on placing our Poetry Postcards on Twitter as well as in my blog. I will add FB also.

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    1. Thanks, Carol, It's zero as I write this am, but warm is on its way! Enjoy your day!

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  19. That's a poem I could read again and again and get something new from it each time. A master! Thanks for hosting today. In my post, I share some of my poetry gifts.

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    1. Happy you enjoyed this poem, Margaret. I look forward to seeing what you share!

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  20. I'll be saving this poem in my notebook, Linda. Thank you for sharing it today. That struggle between the comfort of sticking to what's familiar and the terror/excitement of leaping into the unknown -- I've been there!

    Happy New Year to you.

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    1. I imagine that you have been there, Laura. The poem speaks to me, too, and today especially for this new year. Happy New Year in all the leaps forward!

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  21. I love these lines: "With your eyes, which are almost too tired/
    to free themselves from the familiar,"

    Wonderful - thanks for sharing Rilke! And thanks for hosting. I share your concerns about what is to come, but am also trying to focus on the light and love that are immediately around me. Happy new year, Linda! Hugs!

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    1. Happy that you like the poem, Karen, and that you gather strength from those close to you. We all need that don't we? Happy New Year to you, too!

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  22. Dear Linda, thank you for these Rilke lines which are so so beautiful and inspiring... as are YOU! I'm going to have to get my hands on that book. xo

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    1. Hope you can find it, Irene, and enjoy every bit. Thanks and Happy January!

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  23. Thank you for hosting. I've loved Rilke for a long time, but he always seems fresh.

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    1. You're welcome, Sara. In the time we read, he manages to say something new to us, a blessing!

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  24. Dear Linda, I can almost smell the soup. Happy New Year and thanks for leading us into the year with these thoughtful and adventurous words of Rilke's.

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    1. You're welcome, Violet, and Happy New Year to you!

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  25. Linda, I printed the poem and the picture. I may find a way to tuck it into the 6th grade plans for the day. We had a bit of snow last Sunday which has stuck around all week due to our cold temperatures. Thanks for hosting. Can't wait to read more poems. Maybe during planning time today.

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    1. This sounds like a busy Friday, Ramona. I took that picture at the museum with Imi. We were admiring all the trees reaching to the sky, and now it feels like it was meant to be with this poem. Enjoy!

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  26. Thanks for hosting, Linda. Loved working with you on the Cybils. So fun to celebrate great poetry!

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    1. It was a pleasure working with you, too, Sylvia. Have a wonderful poetry year!

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  27. A great big thank you for hosting, Linda! Love the encouraging words you selected for this first Friday of our new year: "And now let us welcome the new year—full of things that have never been"... and "Whoever you may be: step into the evening. Step out of the room where everything is known."

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    1. You're welcome, Alice. I'm happy you enjoyed these words. Happy New Year!

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  28. Thank you so much for hosting, Linda! And Rilke is a perfect companion for the beginning of this new year!

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    1. You're welcome, Kortney. Happy New Year!

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  29. Thank you for hosting, Linda. You are the perfect poet to begin our year with beauty and peace. Happy New Year...may we all find light. xo

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    1. You're welcome! We will not stop looking, will we, Amy?

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  30. You started our year off just right! I love Rilke's poetry, and I love the line "your house is the last before the far-off." I immediately thought of the westward migration and a light in the window as they left civilization . . . Thank you, Linda!

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    1. You're welcome, Keri. That line brings so many images to our imaginations. I'm glad you like it.

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  31. Thank you so much for hosting, Linda, and for starting the year off on a beautiful note with a celebration of Rilke. The poem is wonderful. I've read it several times now and it lingers with me. Wishing you all the best in 2017.

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    1. Thanks, Molly, and Happy New Year to you, too! I just read your beautiful post, am so glad you had that moment, and then wrote about it!

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  32. This Rilke selection is a perfect fit for seeing the world. Every day when I open my twitter feed to see #haikuforhealing and #commonplacemarvels, I see the world, the weather through your eyes. Such a daily treat!

    PS - Per your inspiration, I have dedicated a new notebook for quotes.

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    1. It has been terrific to read the haiku, and I love that you are now collecting quotes. They inspire me daily.

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  33. Better late than never, right? I love the Rilke quote, I want to share it with my colleagues for when our students begin on Monday. And I lifted the line, step into evening. It feels like it might have a whole other poem attached to it. I've loved reading everyone's haiku. Such a terrific community. Thanks for hosting today.

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    1. So glad you're here, Carol, and that the poem will be something you will use to inspire your colleagues. I'm glad you didn't have to go back this week. What a gift! And now good weather is coming!

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  34. Thank you for hosting, Linda! I think many of us are looking forward to the new year with trepidation. I've made it a mission of mine to incorporate more daily writing into my life, if nothing else than as a way to work through everything that's going on in my head! Wishing you a wonderful 2017, filled with creativity and inspiration!

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    1. You're welcome, Jane. I'm glad that you are finding something to hold onto in this year. It's going to be interesting, and time for us all to pay attention. Happy New Year!

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Having a conversation is a good thing!