Monday, April 3, 2017

#NPM17 - 4/30 Plus Slice of Life

Join us on Tuesdays with the Two Writing Teachers and others who post. 

"Imaginary gardens with real toads in them.       Marianne Moore's definition of poetry
      

       Poetic things of interest:  
See Irene Latham's  Progressive Poem's schedule on the page above.  
        If you'd like to see what everyone is doing for Poetry Month, look HERE at Jama Rattigan's post at Jama's Alphabet Soup.


      
         It's April,  and I am immersed in poetry. Each day, among all the other posts I'm trying to connect with, I'm writing a poem. My goal for Poetry Month: TINY THINGS. My choices may surprise you, and I'm excited to write, share, and read how everyone writes to meet their special goals for celebrating poetry month.
          Being immersed not only means writing but reading. Today I'm happy to share a new poetry collection and my poem about a "tiny thing."  Michelle Schaub has written a book about a summer activity I imagine all of us look forward to. I hope my sharing about it, that it makes you want summer markets to come soon, and you want more poetry delights.

A Promise

peach pit recalls  
over-bursting ripeness
of summer - 
skin-tearing, fuzz-dancing,
senses-squishing
sunlit green
Linda Baie © All Rights Reserved



            Just in time, a farmer’s market celebration that’s as fun as you can imagine. With Michelle Schaub’s rhyming poetry varies as much as the vegetables, and sweet as all the fruit gives Amy Huntington a chance to illustrate the happiness of all the kinds of people who come to the market, including their dogs. The opening poem, “Market Day Today” is the welcome: “Farmers chat./Musicians play./A neighbor-/stroller-/dog parade.” Amy’s illustration begins with a truck full of the goods. They’ve risen “by silver light”, ready to offer all the bounty they have. There’s humor when Farmer Rick, who “places all his items/into stacks precisely planned.”  has a customer, Miss Mallory, who “picks her produce from/the bottom of the pile!” Oh my, the peppers begin to roll. . . 
             The poems describe the activities we know well, not only what’s there to purchase. For example, there’s a poem about choosing what’s ripe. “Can a tap on an apricot/help you to choose?/How do you pick fruit/that’s ripened just right?” The answer: “Just ask the farmer--/she'll give you a bite.” This is one page I loved and copied.


         There’s also the aroma and tastiness of the fresh-baked goods (“a hint of cinnamon dusted on cupcakes”) and roasted corn on the cob (“Wipe the butter off your chin./Ear to ear, you’re sure to grin.”), a  nod to the live musicians (“fiddles pluck/and banjos strum”), and to the beekeepers’ honey (“liquid gold alchemy"). Not only is every page filled with delicious words, but the colorful and entertaining illustrations by Amy show all kinds of activities being enjoyed by a diverse group of people, including one family’s dog “running” through the book with a few hilarious results. I enjoyed them very much.
         I won’t share every exciting thing, but there is much more. And on this early April day, Michelle’s book makes me want to hurry the time for real “Fresh-Picked Poetry” at the farmer’s market.
          You can find more about Michelle here at the publisher, Charlesbridge.

32 comments:

  1. All your hyphenated words seem to mirror the lines of the peach pit! (And yes, I can't wait for summer farmers' markets!!)

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    1. Soon, I think. We have snow this morning, but perhaps that's the end of it? Thanks, Mary Lee.

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  2. So many great sensory words/phrases in your poem, Linda. I especially love "fuzz-dancing." Now I can't wait for fresh peaches to come in season!

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    1. Thanks, LInda, and unfortunately, it will be a while. Have a great day!

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  3. My daughter and I were speculating about when our farmer's market will open just the other day. Unfortunately, our library doesn't have this book yet. I may have to go to the bookstore to read it and then you know what happens...I'll end up buying it. Oh, my blogger friends are not good for my resolve to purchase fewer books. Love your poem about the promise of the peach pit!

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    1. I think ours will begin the first of May, but of course with things trucked in from far away. This is a lovely book, and I love the people included. Like Irene's Fresh Delicious, both celebrate the markets. Hope you can find it at the bookstore! Thanks, Ramona.

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  4. What a wonderful assault on the senses. What's not to love about a farmer's market. Ours is open every Friday year round. A great gathering place.

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    1. Year round? That's wonderful. Ours won't open until May or June for some. This book makes me want to hurry up the time!

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  5. Love the book and will be reviewing it on Friday. :) It certainly makes you hungry for that fresh farmers' market produce.

    Your peach pit poem is a juicy nugget of delight. Peaches are my favorite summer fruit and I always look forward to peach pie. :)

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    1. Peach pie was Arvie's favorite, too, Jama. There is nothing better than a fresh peach. Our excitement grows with those from the western slope, the "Palisade" peaches. I loved Michelle's book as you can see, look forward to your post on Friday!

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  6. Yeah for "Fresh-Picked Poetry." It is now on my must-buy list! Love your peach pit poem (Ahh... alliteration!). I read it first as my memory-- picking and eating. Then I read it as the pit's memory. Love the two possible points of view. Love delighting in something so common.

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    1. Fun to hear about your reading my poem, Alice. It is all about point of view! Michelle's book is a delight, hope you find it soon!

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  7. The poetry book is making me hungry! Gorgeous illustrations - what an inspiration. I love the phrase "fuz dancing," great way to describe that oh so delicate skin.

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    1. Thanks, Laurie, hope you find Michelle's book and enjoy ALL the poems and pages!

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  8. I love your peach poem. You captured the experience of biting into its sweetness perfectly. Thank you for the book recommendation too! I can always count on you, Linda!

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    1. Thanks, Jennifer. I suspect you will love Fresh-Picked Poetry, just right for gardeners!

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  9. What an unlikely subject for a poem. I love how you have activated many of the senses...Thank you Linda!
    www.travelinma.blogspot.com

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    1. You're welcome, Barbara. I really do have a peach pit sitting on a kitchen shelf. It was fun to write to accompany Michelle's wonderful book.

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  10. I always appreciate your book suggestions but I LOVE the peach pit poem and the memories it generates.

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    1. Thank you, Anita. April is always a wonderful time to enjoy the poetry.

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  11. Love the idea of "fuzz-dancing" ! So fun! And what a great book suggestion!

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    1. Thanks, I think some of your younger ones will enjoy the poems, Maureen.

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  12. Love your poem and the post is great. I love children's poetry and did not know this book. Thank you.

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    1. The book is not a month old, Mary Ann, and would connect with anyone who loves this time of year, and the markets. They are such community gatherings!

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  13. I don't believe I've ever read a poem about a peach pit, but this one is as tasty as it is brief--16 words of flavor! Thank you for the heads-up on Fresh Picked Poetry as well. It looks fantastic.

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    1. Thank you, part of this is that seeds fascinate me, but also I do love peaches! Michelle's book is special, hope you'll find and enjoy it.

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  14. Thank you for the promise of peaches and this book of poetry. It looks delicious.

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    1. It's a fun book. Thanks, Julieanne!

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  15. Linda, I love the "over-bursting ripeness" and "sunlit green" your peach pit conjured. And Fresh-Picked Poetry sounds like another must-have! Thank you for sharing it today!

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    1. You're welcome, Catherine. It's a lovely book showing what's coming soon!

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  16. Love the poem, just added the book to my fall shopping cart for the library. Our third graders have a food garden, and we have lots of farmers' markets here in the Austin, TX area. Thanks for the timely share!

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    1. Terrific to hear about your garden, Chris! We had one at our school too, and this book is perfect for it! Enjoy!

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