Monday, October 5, 2020

Monday Reading - All New and Wonderful

Visit Kellee and Ricki at UnleashingReaders and Jen at Teach Mentor Texts to see what they and others have been reading! Your TBR lists will grow! Happy Reading!

     Share with the hashtag #IMWAYR 
  

            My post that shares Irene Latham's new poetry book, This Poem Is A Nest, is shared today on a blog tour. The book came out on September 29th. You can find my post here with a list of others who are on the tour.

      Still wishing all of you educators good days with your students! I admire you very much!


          Thanks to Edelweiss, I had the pleasure of reading Jerry Craft's new book, the "next" story after New Kid, about Drew, best friend Jordan, white rich friend Liam, and all the other kids with them in their eighth-grade year at the elite school they call RAD (Riverdale Academy Day school). They aren't "new kids" anymore yet still find they don't know each other very well, and each struggle with the age-old question of who they are and accepting self, something most new teens (later too) agonize over. Through various scenes at school and outside of school, examining how they are treating each other, how the old history of neighborhood friends is hard on Drew. He has a new flattop haircut (see the cover) that gets touched without permission by a few girls who really do like him, but. . .  Jordan hasn't grown very much and still doesn't have that "boy-stink" he thinks everyone else has, plus he loves drawing and still has to decide whether to transfer to an art school in high school. Liam in his huge home, with pool and maid and driver, doesn't see his father very much and his mother is portrayed as a little out of touch. As you see from the cover of Drew juggling several artifacts. All middle-schoolers, juggle their lives as they grow up. That also includes family, included in the boys' lives as an important part of their support. Craft heightens the tension a few times that made me as a reader turn the pages fast, like one frightening scene where Jordan's dad is driving him somewhere and he's pulled over by the police. Diversity is something the mostly-white school is shown to be of concern, creating some serious moments and some decisions that feel uncomfortable especially for those of color. They are all learning, but it is messy.
            Craft has Jordan create cartoon "intermissions" once in a while, talking about race and class, emotions from his and friend perspectives. The chapter title pages themselves are wonderful predictions of what's coming, all different, but some cleverly parody other popular graphic works for readers like Dav Pilkey's Captain Underpants - The Adventures of Captain Undertones - now in fool color - Chapter 11.  As you read my review, I hope you realize how much I enjoyed this advanced copy, will be sure to purchase for my granddaughter, sixth grade! It's terrific!

             
Thanks to Candlewick Press for this copy!

           There is a lake here in Colorado where a small town was flooded in order to create the lake. This is a story for October, for Halloween sharing! As the blurb states, all that can be seen of the flooded village of Spetzia is the clock tower, but sometimes with the right light, one can see the streets and buildings of the old village. Some whisper that this lake is haunted, but along the shore, Jacob and his father live together and make their living as fishermen. Ellen meets Jacob at the market and over time she spends time helping with the fish, cooking for them, going to market. They fall in love but Jacob is older and says they must wait a while before marriage. What comes later as he is lured underwater by a beautiful specter is a tale to be read by candlelight and one that might make you shiver! Illustrations by P.J. Lynch are gorgeous, sometimes shadowy, often full of emotion, bring the story to life. It's quite an intriguing story.

Thanks to Candlewick Press for this copy!

             Wow! Twenty-five years later, Sam McBratney and Anita Jeram (Guess How Much I Love You) have reunited to create a new and special book for the youngest readers. Little Nutbrown Hare wants to play because Big Nutbrown Hare is busy, and he does. He finds another in a puddle, realizes it is the same 'me'. Then sees a second 'me' in his shadow, and the same recognition happens. But then, a white rabbit appears and after a first meeting, they play and play. The possible "what's next?" will give time for wondering and some predictions with smiles for the happy ending. Finding a friend is a great thing! The softly-colored illustrations are lovely and certainly recognizable from the early, loved book.

The following books are new and from my wonderful library!


           As you see from the cover, this goat is endearing, but is he also a mischief-maker when he escapes? Or is he? Every time, the goat gets out of its pen, the dad brings him back and makes a few changes, always thwarted. An accident here and there causes friction because it's always the goat's fault, the "escape goat". Bright watercolors with black outlining by Robin Preiss Glasser fill Ann Patchett's story with farm life and a busy family (who sometimes have accidents). It's a story that entertains and teaches, all about scapegoats!


          I don't believe anyone should miss a book by Julie Larios and illustrated by Julie Paschkis! When I first read this, I imagined young children loving the story of this little mouse and all his adventures, lots of sounds and funny pictures and an easy-to-follow story to  READ ALOUD! Julie L. includes 26 onomatopoeic sounds with delightful, happy and amusing art by Julie P. As a mentor text, one can teach poetry and the lilt that is brought to life when onomatopoeia is used, plot from the simple story with a glide up and down to that grand finale, tension when the mouse is in danger. There is emotion and quite a few surprises.  Eek! It is a bunch of fun and so much more.


             In your family, these recent months, "three squeezes" may be a way to let everyone know you are there for them, you love them, and will always. Not having that with other friends and family is heartbreaking and I imagine you have seen the news of the sadness without this touch. 
            Jason Pratt takes his story from a baby who cannot walk or stand all the way to when the father himself cannot walk or stand. Throughout this boy's life, he's received those three squeezes, when he's scared in the night or has a big fall and a break and when he has a loss, always shown care from Dad, with three squeezes. Pratt lets the father tell the story of all the years, illustrated with color and lots of emotion by Jason Pratt. It is a warmly poignant book that will be perfect for a baby shower or a new baby.

Now reading - I just couldn't find time to read more of Efren Divided, but I will make it a priority this week!

13 comments:

  1. Thanks, Linda - I'm so glad you enjoyed EEK! Julie Paschkis and I had a lot of fun working together on it. In looking through the books you reviewed here, I'm so aware of our current longing to be able to hug and touch each other; this social distancing, though absolutely necessary, is heart-wrenching. "Three squeezes" would sure be nice! (as would escaping from our "pens"! 😊

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    1. I love it, Julie. It's going to be lots of fun to read to my granddaughters. As for "Three Squeezes", a book certainly for our times and our need for touch. Thank you!

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  2. Will You Be My Friend? is in my pile. Sad to learn about the author's passing. Class Act is on my tbr list. Have a great week!

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    1. Thanks, Lisa, hope you enjoy them both and you have a good week, too!

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  3. I am so excited for Class Act! I have so much love for New Kid, I love that we get to go back into that world. Craft does such an amazing job fleshing out the scenarios that are important for kids to recognize and talk about right now.

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    1. I did get an e-copy, but have ordered it. I want to read it again, then pass it on to my granddaughter. I love how much Jerry Craft is so real with the kids. Thanks, Michele.

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  4. I'm really looking forward to Class Act, since I loved New Kid, so I'm glad to hear it's good! The Haunted Lake sounds like an intriguing story, and Three Squeezes sounds great as well! Thanks for the great post!

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    1. Yes, both are great! I hope you enjoy them like I did! Thanks!

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  5. My husband ordered Class Act back in May, so our guys are really looking forward to that being a read aloud this month!! Three Squeezes is new to me and looks SO cute. While we cannot spend much time close to others, hugs and back rubs have become increasingly important in our family. I'll be on the lookout for this book. Thanks for all the shares, Linda!

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    1. Class Act was just great and I hope you can find Three Squeezes, too, so sweet. Thanks, Shaye!

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  6. Class Act was a worthy follow up to New Kid. Hoping to post my review soon. EEK is in my pile. Your review is moving it up my pile!

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    1. Thanks, Laura, yes, I agree about Class Act. Hope you have fun reading EEK!

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  7. Class Act is a worthy follow up to New Kid. Hoping to post my review soon!

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