Saturday, March 1, 2014

Slice Number Two - The March Weaving Saga Begins

        It's my first Sunday post in a long time, but it's March, and time to write every day!
       Come stop by the Two Writing Teachers blog to visit as many slicers as you can. Much to enjoy!  

     I'm excited to say I have four colleagues slicing with us this month. Please welcome them! 

Suparna at http://meandmysoliloquy.blogspot.com

Katie at http://prosecents.blogspot.com   Katie wrote in the first SOLC with me!

Kam at http://kamsreading.blogspot.com

Max at http://teachingfrombehind.blogspot.com     
                and Max's class at http://maxsclassreads.blogspot.com


“It is not that I'm so smart. But I stay with the questions much longer.” 


         Yesterday I wrote about a loom from my mother that I wanted to set up to try a different kind of activity. I love reading and writing and spend a tremendous amount of time doing them, but it's good to access different kinds of creativity I think, hence this new idea of mine.  
          Since yesterday, I've found that this is going to be a bigger challenge than I imagined. I think I'll post my progress each Sunday and that will help me with deadlines. I have many other things to do including slicing, books to read for book groups, tax info to prepare, some things to write for work, my house to clean (Yes, I say to myself, I really do need to get out the vacuum and the swiffer duster.) 



           Yikes! Now there is the beginning of the loom sitting on my dining table, and the directions sitting by it, and more pieces in the box. This is a different loom than I've used before, so I think the internet is going to be helpful. I spent some time reading the directions, but now need to sit with them along with the laptop to look up terms, hoping to discover a great Youtube video that will help. I have the equipment; now need to learn how to use it!  It might also be a great opportunity to connect with what we ask students to do all the time. We give them "things" and "directions" and sometimes it's hard, and they need that support, the scaffold. And sometimes we don't realize it, just wonder if they've tried hard enough. 
         I'll let you know how hard I tried!
The first step-unscrew, put bars through, be sure to tighten well.

Figure out if the 'heddle blocks' are in the right place. Still don't know.

the first of several pages
the motivation

66 comments:

  1. Vacuum? What's that? :-) Linda, I love how you connected your process of assembling the loom to our work with students. It is so eye-opening when we ourselves are learners trying something new, or completing a task that requires us to read directions. Good luck getting the loom together! I can't wait to hear more about your project.

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    1. It's going to be interesting to do this, Catherine, step by step! Thank you!

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  2. What an amazing "follow directions" activity this would be for the kids! Bring it to school and make it a challenge!

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    1. When I did weaving projects with my students, they did help set up a bigger loom, and learned to place the weft, etc., but I don't have a class so can't do it this time. Would be fun, you're right, Anita.

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  3. Definitely a case for close reading and developing some of that tier 3 vocabulary. I will look forward to the Sunday updates on your "looming" project. :-)

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    1. Ha! Love the idea of 'close' reading, Elsie, indeed!

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  4. Wow! I'm intimidated by just looking at those directions. Can't wait to see what you create.

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    1. So happy you understand that this is a big learning curve! We'll see what happens! Thanks, Katherine.

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  5. I am looking forward to your Sunday updates. The motivation picture is my favorite.

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    1. Thank you-I suspect that is truly what will keep me going!

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  6. Linda,
    The colors in your basket whisper of stories yet untold. Happy weaving.

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    1. Thanks Ruth-I am excited about those choices!

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  7. Yikes. This looks tough. Not just the setting up but the work that follows, too. So glad that you included the motivation as your last picture. That makes it all worth it. I'll be anxious to read next Sunday's post!

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    1. Now the next challenge is to find time to play with all of it. I'm determined!

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  8. Those directions don't look very easy! YouTube would be my choice as well!

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    1. Yes, later in the day, after some commenting, Youtube here I come! thanks Jaana!

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  9. The pictures tell as much as your writing. I love that the baskets of weaving materials is your inspiration, rather than a pattern of rug. It's like you might create anything and the possibilities are endless! Good luck with the whole process.

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    1. Thanks Max, love that 'possibilities are endless'. Whatever happens, I know it will be a good time!

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  10. As I read your piece, I couldn't help but be struck by the same conclusion you had -- that doing research such as you will be doing is so authentic and the types of research we need to share with students. They need to know that research has purpose and an end goal.
    On the other hand, I am quite impressed with the fact that you're tackling this loom. Have to say, I might have given up when I saw those directions. :) Can't wait to see the progress next Sunday! Enjoy the creativity this project unleashes.

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    1. Thanks Karen, I am hopeful that it will work out. As a last resort, there is an awesome weaving store in Boulder where I could get some 'hands-on' instruction. It's not too far from me, about 30 minutes, so that could be fun as well. Yes, this applies to our teaching for sure!

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  11. One of the reasons I do SOL, and other activities where I am a beginner, is to remind myself of the challenges my students face when I present them with new concepts and ask them to work with new tools. And Linda - I have a field trip idea for you! At the Maya exhibit at DMNS there is a whole section on weaving, staffed by a helpful docent with a hands on cart! Besides it being a gorgeous exhibit.

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    1. I am a member & need to go, Katie. Thanks for telling me about the exhibit too. A long time ago I subbed at a school where the principal required everyone to take a 'big' learning project, like learning a musical instrument, etc. He wanted them to understand about learning on a deeper level, & to connect with their students better. I've never forgotten that! Such learner when one is the beginner!

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  12. Those directions certainly look intimidating. Being a quilter though, I think the difficulty of putting it together will be worth it in the end. Again, being a quilter, my eyes went immediately to the quilt that the loom is sitting on. It is beautiful and from the pictures I am assuming it is an antique. Good luck and I look forward to reading your progress on your new creative adventure!

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    1. Yes, the quilt is one I found a long while ago at an antique store. I have others from family, but this one serves well as a table cover. Thanks for the wishes!

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  13. Oh my gosh, I'm so excited for you! I suspect setting up the loom will be the hardest part. I wonder if there is an art teacher or weaver that would be willing to help you! Can't wait to see this adventure progress! And forget the vacuuming- this looks way more important.

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    1. Don't worry, I won't run right away to the vacuum! Yes, I too think the setting up will be the most difficult, but will take a few hours today to see what I can accomplish. Thanks Carol, sending good thoughts your way!

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  14. Don't you just love directions? I sometimes wonder who writes them and for whom are they written. Good luck with putting it together, I know you will succeed.

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    1. Yes, the directions are quite 'obtuse', written from someone who knows, not so helpful to someone who doesn't know. Thanks for being there with my take on those kinds of words!

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  15. Well, this seems like a big task, Linda - but that loom does look rather enticing, what with all the yarn at hand. I'm impressed that you made sense of the directions - they always look like Greek to me!

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    1. I am only "starting' to make sense, Tara. The basic ones were easy, but the rest of it, hm-m! That's why I need to laptop right beside me in this next part! Thanks!

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  16. I've always loved weaving. I've taken several courses, but only used someone else's loom - never had to set it up! I do have an old loom in the basement - haven't used it in years. You have sparked an interest to dig it out and try again. All the best in your journey - will be looking forward to your updates!

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    1. I should have known you would have done something like this with all your creative projects, Beverley! Now if you only lived down the block! Thank you-so glad to see you doing the SOLC!

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  17. The possibilities the yarn basket holds, plus the curiosity you have planted in your audience, will keep you reading and figuring out how to get started and keep going. I sincerely hope it will be more fun than frustration.

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    1. The hard part will be this set-up, Terje. The rest, the color and texture choices will be one big experiment-fun I think. Thanks for the wish!

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  18. I'm a knitter, so I well understand the challenge of following complex directions with the end goal being a beautiful finished piece. Youtube has quickly become my best friend when I need to see a stitch demonstrated because I couldn't visualize it while reading.

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    1. Terrific to know, Mindi. That's my next thing to do!

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  19. I don't know about the loom Linda looks like fun...but I LOVE the quilt...and as far as the house work, ick. lol

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    1. Yes-maybe the housework in the afternoon? Listening to some good music? Thanks Tammy!

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  20. Oh, that is beautiful. So many possibilities before you. Makes me want to do something crafty RIGHT NOW.

    Thanks for pointing us to your colleagues' blogs, Linda. How exciting to have friends doing it with you.

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    1. Thanks Stacey, will be working at the weaving. It is fun to imagine what will happen! And, yes, very exciting to have my colleagues doing the SOLC too. Have a good and cozy Sunday. It's very cold today, hoping for warmer later in the week!

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  21. Looks like fun! I have pulled out an old quilt that I never finished and have begun to work in it. It is always good to find creativity in new places. Looking forward to watching your progress. I like the Sunday deadline idea!

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    1. Happy to hear that others like to find new ways to be creative, Joanne. Thanks for telling me about your quilt!

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  22. What a project ahead! I am interested to hear how it unfolds.

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    1. Thanks Dana-will keep working on it!

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  23. So cool. I've dreamed of looming. But I have enough challenge on my plate right now, especially the guitar crying for me to swipe off her dust and start strumming, esp. with a lesson tomorrow morning :)

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    1. Oh-glad to hear that a lesson is coming, Bonnie. I know you love doing it, but it has been a while, hasn't it? I don't need more, but do think this will be a great change! Have a good week strumming!

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  24. What an exciting endeavor - a loom! I am hopeful for you. Love the wisdom in your line, "It might also be a great opportunity to connect with what we ask students to do all the time." What a beautiful thing it would be if we had this very thought in the back of our mind when we took on new challenges!

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    1. Thanks Maureen-it really will be fun I'm sure. I've done a little more today, figuring out where what goes, etc.

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  25. Oh, Linda - I can't wait to see how it goes! Perhaps you ought to create a video of your endeavors and upload it onto YouTube? : )

    Thanks for the warm welcome!

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    1. Thanks much Suparna, but I think I'd better watch a few videos first-te he. I have found them, now to find the time...

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  26. When I looked at Max's class description on their blog yesterday, I wondered if it was at your school. How neat! Good luck with the loom -- I like how you related your struggle to students' struggles!

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    1. Yes, he is my colleague, teaches in my old room-a great teacher, Jennifer. Thanks for the comment about the student struggles. I do connect to that-know that all of us "learners" have those same kinds of challenges, & hope teachers understand that.

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  27. Thanks for sharing your process with us. You will inspire others to try something new. Don't know where you find the time.

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    1. You're welcome, Margaret. I do just sneak in a few minutes when I can. And this new thing might take away from something else, but that's okay. I'm very interested in doing it.

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  28. What a great idea to slice with a group! There's power in numbers : )

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    1. Yes, it's wonderful to have colleagues with me, Beth! We'll have fun together!

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  29. I love that you are getting out that loom to try something new. It looks complicated! I can't wait to read more about your progress with it next Sunday!

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    1. Oh, it is complicated, Andrea. I haven't seen it yet, but found an 18 minute video telling how to fix the weft (the thread that one weaves across). But even today I've made a little progress!

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  30. Good luck with this project, Linda. I learned to weave when I was in college. It is a wonderful art!

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    1. Thank you-might contact you occasionally, Deb. So great to hear!

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  31. A snow day today allowed me to revisit this post and collect the weblinks for the new slicers on your staff...how awesome that so many colleagues have joined you this year! Any idea if TWT will identify all the first year slicers - I would love to be emphasizing them when I go to read/make comments, ensuring that they feel welcomed. (Not sure who to ask this question of - figured you were in the know, Linda!)

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    1. If you contact me I can send you a list, Maureen, although I'm not sure it's completely current. A person who's managing that is Bonnie K. One more that's not on the list is on slice 3. I don't know whether you are excited by a snow day or not! Hope things settle down soon for you all in the east.

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  32. I am so impressed. My kids say all the time, "What did you do before Google?" I am excited to see your progress. :) BTW, my son taught himself to knit by watching YouTube.

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    1. Still haven't found time, but I discovered a YouTube that will show me exactly about this particular loom-pretty amazing I agree! Thanks Julie!

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    2. What a great idea! Sometimes working with your hands is just the thing. I like having someone explain things to me rather than trying to muddle through a manual. Thank goodness for YouTube!

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    3. I "hope" I'll be able to find time to watch the Youtube tonight, Tabatha. I'm so excited to then mess with the yarn, choosing choosing! I agree that working with some kind of 'hand' craft will be terrific!

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Having a conversation is a good thing!