Monday, April 10, 2017

#SOL17 and #NPM17 - 11/30

 Join us on Tuesdays with the Two Writing Teachers and others who post. 
"Who can tell the dancer from the dance?"  ~ Yeats


       My goal for Poetry Month: TINY THINGS. My choices may surprise you, and I'm excited to write, share, and read how everyone writes to meet their special goals for celebrating poetry month.

    

       Poetic things of interest:  
See the page on the bar above for the Progressive Poem's schedule of poets, hosted by Irene Latham at Live Your Poem.  

And, if you'd like to see what everyone is doing for Poetry Month, look HERE at Jama Rattigan's post at Jama's Alphabet Soup.


         Bridget Magee and her family have started a project in response to the chaos happening in our government. Go HERE to find out about it, to see how you can help!

          I've owned a small cedar box that someone gave me long ago and it came with a tiny padlock and key. I've always had it and it's kept some things special and private to me most of my life. When my children were young, they were so curious, but I never let them see what was inside. You'll see why when you read my poem. I didn't include everything in the box, but you'll understand the idea of "private", I think. 




          Sonnet Show & Tell

 A baby ring, a ticket stub, a star.
The tiny key reveals a box of gems
I had forgotten served as a memoir,
a handkerchief embroidered by a friend.

Old images show me of days long past,
in photobooths with friends that made me smile.
Bound letters from the love that didn’t last,
I sat and read, remembering a while.

In later years I used the box to hide
a mother’s buried treasure underneath
the evidence I took a fairy’s side:      
a covered jar of children’s baby teeth.

These things I shared were opened with my key.
You too have one; it’s called your memory.
Linda Baie © All Rights Reserved

So Far-Tiny Things

April 1 - Two Plates - Thanksgiving
April 2 - In Each Mind's Eye - baby elephant
April 3 - Discovered April First - miniature book
April 4 - A Promise - peach seed
April 5 -  haiku - one music note
April 6 - My Tiny List - must-do list
April 7 - Tiny Lights - window lights at dusk
April 8 - Cherita - pencil stub
April 9 - Apple Blooms - blooms/apple tree
April 10 - Walk to The Sea - salt crystals


28 comments:

  1. Oh, Linda, that is so beautiful! The top drawer of my dresser is where I hide all of the motherly treasures -- handmade cards, locks of hair, favorite baby pictures. I love to go through it every now and then and remember. Someday, my kids will enjoy it too. There are stories behind the things we keep in this space.

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    1. They are treasures for mothers, aren't they, Jennifer. I love hearing about your drawer full of special things.

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  2. That was outstanding! I am really glad I read your blog this morning!

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  3. Such a tender and accomplished poem. I appreciate the emphasis on the small things--the small matters that are often placeholders for what is most essential. Your poem brings me back to a box I have secreted in a drawer with keepsakes from my son and from my mom. Lovely to recall. Thanks Linda.

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    1. Thanks, Mary Ann, and for sharing that you too have a box holding the important things.

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  4. This is inspired and special. I love the use of words memoir and memory. You should explore the love that didn't last. My mother in law is currently visiting her lost love this week. They've reconnected after 60 years.

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    1. That 'love' is long gone, Margaret, but I love hearing about your mother. Thanks for telling about it, amazing!

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  5. What varied and beautiful memories that box holds. A tiny key opens a treasure trove of life experiences.

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  6. Lovely. You made me pause a while this morning. I liked your second stanza. Do they still have those "photobooths"? They were the forerunner of today's selfies, right?! "Bound letters"--WOW! Just yesterday my husband and I were talking of a box that has our letters written during his years in the military--a record of our first years of marriage. I've not looked in that box YEARS. I also have a very small cedar chest with my dad and mom's love letters written before they married. And I have another box of my dad's letters to me during my college years.

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    1. I think there are still those photo booths in places like amusement parks, but I haven't seen them anywhere else. They were fun! Love hearing about all your letters, Alice. Thanks!

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  7. Your poem is inspired as is the subject. The idea of a box holding bits of your life, a physical memoir is just gorgeous. Each piece in that box tells a tale. And, if I haven't said it already, I am in awe of your project. Finding the big thing in the tiny is a brilliant way to notice and appreciate our world.

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    1. Thanks, Julieanne, as you wrote today too, we all have lots of "stuff", some of which means a lot.

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  8. That was beautiful. I have a small bag that was given to me to hold jewelry when I traveled....it too contains those baby tooth relics! I also have a prayer box....I glimpsed inside last summer and smiled and cried. Thank you for jogging the memories out of hiding.

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    1. You're welcome, Anita and thank you for sharing! I love that phrase "jogging the memories out of hiding."

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  9. Oh...Linda. This is simply lovely. I am wanting to read more sonnets by Linda B. Just lovely. And so true. I was not so good at hiding teeth... Please tuck a copy of this in your special box. Beautiful... xxx

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    1. They are fun to do, but this took me some time, Amy. What a nice idea to copy & put it in the box! Thank you!

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  10. What a lovely sonnet! So many tender memories woven into a beautiful tapestry of life. Well done, Linda!

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    1. Thank you, Catherine. It was a special one to write.

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  11. You drew me right in from the beginning. Such a sweet collection of memories.

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    1. Thanks, Barbara. It was fun to write.

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  12. I have one of those cedar boxes too! It has an odd assortment of stuff. I should look it up one of these days. Might provide some inspiration for a poem. I'm amazed that you were able to use the sonnet form, it's quite challenging!

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  13. Oh, my. Letters from a love that didn't last....a jar of baby teeth. These truly are a memoir. Lovely poem. I think I will use this as a mentor text. Thank you!

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