Thursday, April 11, 2013

Looking at Education

                Diane Mayr, managing three blogs, is hosting Poetry Friday today, all day!  Please visit her, and everyone else at Random Noodling!  Thanks, Diane!

              See my POETRY LINKS PAGE - for all the wonderful things going on during April.  The Progressive Poem links are on the right of this page.

"Poetry is the art of substantiating shadows."  Edmunde Burke

            I've read blog posts in these past weeks from teachers who are sad to start the spring testing, feeling that it's a disservice to their students.  They express dismay that they are told they cannot tell a student who has overlooked a section to return to complete it.  They feel they are betraying students who have worked hard this year, but are not yet able to feel the least bit of success in a test that is still beyond their capabilities.  And they wonder at the test creators who are asking those who know most of the answers to sit being tested on nothing.  
            In writing, I've worked in different structures as often as I can, and recently attempted the French Lai, explained here.  Examples I found appear to be rather romantic in theme, but I found no expectation of that, only the strict structure.  

            Here are two responses to current educational news:



The Way We Want It To Be

students rollicking
like lambs gamboling
schools start
children flourishing
it’s encouraging
teach smart
no admonishing
day’s end picnicking
warm heart
(c) Linda Baie, all rights reserved

The Way I Hear It Is

student enters test
bubbles filling best
can't slow
complete all the rest
then they’ll be impressed 
the show
proving that I’m blessed
and I have progressed
job--snow
     (c) Linda Baie, all rights reserved

photo credit: jesuscm [on/off] via photopin cc


26 comments:

  1. HA! Job - snow! Isn't that the truth. These two are exactly how I felt teaching...and the disparity in the two is what made me want to retire as early as possible. The dissonance that is set up is unsettling. I want the gamboling, not the gambling.

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    1. Thanks, Donna. It is something that I hope is solved in a good way for teachers soon!

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  2. Thanks to the introduction to the lai. I'll need to study it a little more closely. By the way, that's a great quote you started with!

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    1. Thank you Diane. When you look at the link, you'll see there are variations, too. Fun to work within!

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  3. It's always interesting to learn about a new form. i like the contrast between the two.

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    1. Thanks Liz. It's one of those times I felt impelled to focus on the topic.

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  4. Linda "The Way I Hear It Is" -- exactly what I'm hearing from my friends who are classroom teachers. My daughter's math class is one year ahead. They stopped for a few week's before state mandated testing (in March) to review for the test, as children are assessed at their grade level -- not at the level of the classes they are taking. It's insane.

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    1. I agree, quite senseless. I wish that 'testers' would realize that there are many levels to test for, not just apply the same thing to everyone who happens to be a certain age. Guess I'm also speaking to the choir today!

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  5. Thanks for introducing me to this new form! I am unfamiliar with it. (I agree with you about the tests.)

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    1. Hope you give the form a try, Tabatha. Thanks!

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  6. Yet another reminder of the proof that all this school testing is nonsense and a criminal waste of children's precious time and energy. So sad!

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    1. Yep. I keep asking my grandson about school; he keeps telling me that they're practicing for the tests! Thanks, Andi!

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  7. Thanks for sharing these, Linda - I hadn't heard of the lai before. And I do feel for the students and teachers saddled with all this testing!

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    1. Me too, Matt. Hope you try the lai form sometime. Thank you!

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  8. Ugh, my daughters start their testing next week...:-(
    I've never heard of lai either - another form to explore. Thanks for sharing, Linda! =)

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    1. You're welcome Bridget. I hope all the testing is over soon so everyone can get back to the 'good stuff'!

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  9. I really loved The Way We want it To Be.... Especially in testing season! I've never heard of this form of poetry, Linda- I'll have to give a whirl and see what I come up with!

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    1. I hope you like giving it a whirl, Tara! And certainly best wishes in the testing.

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  10. Love the poems, Linda! Heartbreaking and yet inspiring to remember "the way we want it to be"! I've never heard of that poetic form either -- thanks for sharing it with us!

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    1. You're welcome Jennifer. Hope you try the form sometime! Thank you!

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  11. It's just so frustrating that everybody sees how wrong it is, but it seems impossible to do anything about it! Ugh. (I like your poems, though.)

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    1. Someone must know how to get through. Maybe a sit down? I don't even have to deal with it because we don't test at my school. I'm just sad that I keep hearing others say how disheartened they are. Thanks, Ruth!

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  12. So many levels to ponder here today, Linda! I've heard of the form but need to take a closer look. Thanks for tackling with this important subject - which makes me sigh. And feel droopy. I hope my daughter and other current educators-in-training can find some balance down the road.

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    1. Oh, I hope so, too, Robyn. I can't imagine that these new teachers aren't disheartened by all the news and the responses happening in education today. Thank you. I hope you'll try the lai, or some form of it!

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  13. oops, my comment was swallowed whole again by blogger. as i originally noted, i can understand this conundrum even more so given the fact that i am a clinician who administers tests at the same time that i am a mother of an eleven year old girl who positively loathes tests. Like Robyn said, I do hope that a balance can be achieved in the future. :)

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    1. I think that some are just taking the testing a few steps too far, Myra. Thanks for your wish for balance!

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Having a conversation is a good thing!